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Wading options for backpacking

What are the other ESSENTIAL pieces of equipment you carry with you? How do you pack? How do you hold your gear while fishing? Fly boxes? Snips? you tell us.

Re: Wading options for backpacking

Postby Berner9 » Sun Nov 20, 2011 6:11 pm

rmcworthing wrote:
JDP1292 wrote:As my other thread stated I'm starting to compile a backpacking kit for short, 2-3 day backpacking trips. My biggest question is what do you do for wading?


Water in the backcountry here in Utah is often cold enough to preclude wet wading.

I am just beginning work with a manufacturer on designing a pair of waders specifically for backpacking. Functional efficiency will be the driving principle - simple, light, multipurpose. I should preface this by saying I am an ultralight guy. So while I intend them to last, a bit of durability and comfort (ie. breathability) will have to be sacrificed to meet the goal.

Don't hold your breath, but I'll be sure to post once we have a prototype.

In the meantime, if anyone wants to share input on what they would like to see in a pair of waders specifically for backpacking, post up.


Ultralight guy myself. Very interested to see what you come up with.

Ive always wanted to do a MYOG thick cuben fiber hip high socks. Not sure if they could handle it though.
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Re: Wading options for backpacking

Postby rmcworthing » Sun Nov 20, 2011 8:45 pm

Berner9 wrote:Ultralight guy myself. Very interested to see what you come up with.

Ive always wanted to do a MYOG thick cuben fiber hip high socks. Not sure if they could handle it though.


The base of our waders will be Cuben, reinforced with Dyneema X where it counts. The height will be adjustable. Other than that, no frills. For many reasons, I don't intend on including an outer boot (weight, durability, etc).

If one is so inclined, they should functionally pull double duty as 1) waders 2) drybag 3) rain pants 4) gaiters.

Like all waders, they won't be for everyone. But there is a hole in the market for backpackers who want a lightweight option that will get them through some fishing along the trail, or help catch dinner and boost the calorie count. These waders are designed specifically to fill that hole.

Kinda looking forward to ploughing through some knee deep snow with my pack on, too!

Rob
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Re: Wading options for backpacking

Postby CraigP » Mon Nov 21, 2011 5:33 am

looking forward to it, it may be just what I need (well, want, to be honest) as long as you can overcome the durability issues (see below). without a neoprene sock, you are saving about 300g per pair when wet, as neoprene socks hold about 100-130g of water per pair in the outside surface.
will cuben be strong enough though? I would have thought it would tend to tear when snagged on branches, blackberry or gorse bushes etc? for australia or NZ conditions, I think that you may need to put a full layer of dyneema over all the surface to protect them adequately, which may make them a lot heavier. as the goretex waders are 3-5 layer, would a dyneema cuben laminate would be lighter or similar? They'd be ok here for open rivers, but would need reinforcing for bush work.
regards
craig
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Re: Wading options for backpacking

Postby rmcworthing » Mon Nov 21, 2011 6:39 pm

CraigP wrote:will cuben be strong enough though? I would have thought it would tend to tear when snagged on branches, blackberry or gorse bushes etc?


Point well taken. While cuben is far more resilient (especially puncture proof) than its delicate feel would imply, I wouldn't recommend crashing through brush in them. Nor are they intended for comfort with all-day use.

This design will be for the backpacker doing some fishing, who is primarily interested in keeping weight down to cover trail miles comfortably.
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Re: Wading options for backpacking

Postby Berner9 » Tue Nov 22, 2011 5:27 am

I can see them great with some water draining shoes like the Salomon Tech Amphibians. Ive owned a couple cuben packs and tents but never use them long enough to see how they wear out. If there is cuben around your foot getting crushed and all crinkly in your shoes, I can see it will breaking down quickly and start leaking. Just a thought.
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Re: Wading options for backpacking

Postby Serana » Tue May 21, 2019 6:33 am

Sorry for bumping this old thread. I'm struggling with the same question. I need comfortable shoes but even don't know how to start my search because don't have any criteria for purchasing!

I use Tevas and they are good in camp and for stream crossing, these are my luxury item but they add considerable weight. Others recommend Chacos, are they lighter than Tevas? I would change if there is something lighter that you can hike as well at times like the Tevas. I have tried Crocs and they are good but bulky. I have also tried the MYO insole flip flop whilst light they are not very practical even in camp. The Teva Zilch save a couple of ounces but are minimal so concerned about hiking any distance in those.

I've seen a few hikers use soft lighter with ballet shoes and something similar as hospita sock slippers that have had some silicone, Shoo Goo, or Mcnett's Seam Grip lightly smeared to the bottom.

Several years ago I converted from Gore-tex boots to mesh as the waterproof boots were inevitably wet after a day of rain and would then take several days to dry out! Even on a humid warm day, I would ring out a pint of sweat from my socks after a few strenuous hours because the waterproof membrane is just not breathable enough in those conditions. The mesh boots will certainly get wet in a solid rainstorm or on a very wet trail, but they also dry out in a few miles. On the JMT, with the reduced humidity, they would likely dry out even faster. I won't be bringing fording shoes for my future Maine and JMT hikes.
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