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Alchohol Stoves

Tenkara is a great type of fishing for backpacking and securing a meal when out in the woods. This forum discusses backpacking in general and how it relates ot tenkara: fish recipes, favorite spots, ultra-light backpacking

Re: Alchohol Stoves

Postby Karl Klavon » Fri Oct 19, 2012 1:20 pm

Note of caution: Using any stove that produces a flame in an enclosed space requires adequate ventilation to be provided. These stoves, regardless of the type or fuel being used, produce carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide gases, which are colorless, odorless, and tasteless gases that are heavier than air, displace oxygen, poison your body, and will cause you to fall into a sleep from which you will never return with out some outside help.
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Re: Alchohol Stoves

Postby Karl Klavon » Fri Nov 02, 2012 10:47 am

There are a lot of alcohol stoves out there of other designs that are not true Penny Stoves. And placing a penny on a stove of another design does not a true Penny Stove make. Clicking on the links given above by two other people will get you to the true Penny Stove designs, which if you look into it are substantially different from most of the other alcohol stove designs out there. And this design also includes a smother/travel cap that allows you to put the stove out any time you want to put it out, fairly quickly and easily. For your convenience here is link again for the most current Penny Stove design: http://www.jureystudio.com/pennystove/penny2.html
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Re: Alchohol Stoves

Postby CJOttawa » Mon Nov 05, 2012 6:15 am

please delete
Last edited by CJOttawa on Mon Mar 26, 2018 3:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Alchohol Stoves

Postby Karl Klavon » Mon Nov 05, 2012 2:30 pm

I also have a Trangia stove, which I some times use for day trips because you can carry it all fueled up and ready to go, leaving the fuel bottle at home. Many backpackers are looking for the lightest weight stove they can possibly find. The cost of the stove is usually a secondary consideration, if it comes into the decision making process at all.

Take a look at the statistics on the efficiency of the penny stove vs the competition given on the link provided: http://www.jureystudio.com/pennystove/#2 and click on the heading "Independent Tests" if they do not come up with the link.

The Trangia has to be primed and brought up to pressure before cooking on it can begin, but it is not a bad stove at all. At one time they were a standard issue item for every Swedish Army recruit. With the Penny Stove you get a blue flame on ignition, so you can start cooking on a Penny Stove as soon as it is lit. Many alcohol stove designs require the use of a priming pan. The Penny stove does not, and it is much more wind resistant than the Trangia and most of the other designs out there are.

True, the Penny Stove is not as durable as the Trangia stove is. But it is more than durable enough for most of us. So far I have not had any problems with damaging any of my backpacking stoves, regardless of type or make. I believe stove choice is more a matter of personal preference than it has anything to do with functional issues. There are plenty of backpacking stoves out there on the market that will get the job done more than well enough.
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