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Motorcycles and Tenkara

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Re: Motorcycles and Tenkara

Postby tpalka » Thu Jul 04, 2013 7:14 pm

Lots of info here! I'll just second -- I often ride my Yamaha WR250R, in waders and wading boots. From the moment I put the kickstand down, I can usually be in the water in 3-4 minutes... I made a big tube out of PVC that sites on my rear rack -- and the rod rides in it. A duffel bag in the back has my net and waist pack. Keeps it all simple. 75 mpg is great, and it's fun getting to the local fishing spots.

tom.

PS. Attaching a photo of a buddy of mine, he's 6'7" and makes my bike look small. You can see the orange rod tube, and the green duffel bag.
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Re: Motorcycles and Tenkara

Postby dwalker » Thu Jul 04, 2013 9:42 pm

tpalka wrote:Lots of info here! I'll just second -- I often ride my Yamaha WR250R, .


Cool, not much different than my little bike. One Fly One Cylinder. ;)
Advrider also has the WR250R Mega Thread
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=329337&page=2424

And the WRR has a dedicated web page
http://www.wrrdualsport.com/

The XT225 does too. Now also includes the 250.
http://www.xt225.com/

tpalka wrote:... I made a big tube out of PVC that sites on my rear rack -- and the rod rides in it. .....


Naw, that's not a big tube. These are big rod tubes.
http://advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=16578174&postcount=16

Then there are folks who say, " I don't need no stinkin tube."
http://advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=16588939&postcount=24

Then there's us and other enlightened folks. ;)
From the location stamp - looks like a couple of your Colo. neighbors.
http://advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=16578456&postcount=18
http://advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=16575841&postcount=36

http://advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=16689947&postcount=29

Well, just kidding. Whatever way people find that combines ridin n fishin is good. :)

D
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Re: Motorcycles and Tenkara

Postby John @ Tenkara USA » Fri Jul 05, 2013 4:06 pm

Thanks so much for taking the time to share all of that info. I really should be giving more consideration to dual sport bikes. A lot of the best tenkara streams here in Montana are a long way up a forrest service road. Most of them would be OK with a standard (I think), but a dual sport bike would open up a lot of stuff to me, and a lot of that stuff would be so remote that I would be quite as worried about the problem of theft you talked about. Of course, if someone did come buy it would be that much easier to steal. :(

My big problem is that I've got short tree trunk legs and a lot of the dual sport bikes sit up so high I'm not at all comfortable on them. I know that some aren't as bad, so I may have to look at more of them. Plus, I can find them used around here. Most of the street bikes I see for sale here are big Harley's or Harley clones. I don't see many smaller standards or cruisers on the used market, but there are a fair amount of dual sport bikes.

Thanks so much for the riding tips and the link to the video. I may get the DVD and watch it even if I don't go with a dual sport bike, just to learn some more of the skills and what that type of bike is capable of.

I almost wish I'd never seen the Royal Enfield; it does sound perfect but it's just more than I want to spend, and I don't see the used ones going all that much cheaper, unless they're old enough they predate the newer engine you mentioned that I've read such good things about. Man, what a cool bike though. :) Thanks again!
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Re: Motorcycles and Tenkara

Postby dwalker » Fri Jul 05, 2013 11:18 pm

John @ Tenkara USA wrote:Thanks so much for taking the time to share all of that info. I really should be giving more consideration to dual sport bikes. A lot of the best tenkara streams here in Montana are a long way up a forest service road. ....., and a lot of that stuff would be so remote that I would be quite as worried about the problem of theft you talked about. Of course, if someone did come buy it would be that much easier to steal. :(


You're welcome. Really I should thank you. Looking into this stuff has gotten me revved up to stop being distracted with other interest and get my MCs on the road. ;) A good opportunity to use some of the lightweight backpacking gear I've been acquiring too.

You know your locals much better than I do about their tendency to vandalize or steal your stuff. However, it is usually a bigger worry than an actuality. I've rode to Maine twice, Yellowstone once, Rapid City the year after. No one bothered my stuff while I walked around Devil's Tower. Through Mich UP 3 or 4 times ( and I didn't get blown off the Mackinaw Straits Bridge crossing over, which people had predicted as my fate for 400 miles getting there) , and down into Miss., and along the Chesapeake Bay. And had rain storms at night chase me into hotels where it seemed prudent to look out the window every 30 minutes to make sure the bike was still there because the guest in the neighboring rooms appeared to change every 45 minutes. And the only time I ever had anything taken off my bike was at a gas station in Grafton, WV. ( the birthplace of the Mother's Day of all places) Some low life took my gloves. Luckily I had a spare pair. But losing or rather having one pair of $20 gloves stolen over close to 90,000 miles or so of riding is an acceptable record. However. that kind of travel is a little different than leaving your bike out of sight while you wade a stream with no clear sight back to your ride.

John @ Tenkara USA wrote:My big problem is that I've got short tree trunk legs and a lot of the dual sport bikes sit up so high I'm not at all comfortable on them. I know that some aren't as bad, so I may have to look at more of them. Plus, I can find them used around here. Most of the street bikes I see for sale here are big Harley's or Harley clones. I don't see many smaller standards or cruisers on the used market, but there are a fair amount of dual sport bikes.


Hey, I am inseam length challenged too. 28.5" on tall days. And the bad news is if you don't die young. You get shorter too. Getting fitted for custom made kilts last year I discovered I lost an inch somewhere over the past 40 years. :( But I don' think it was in the length of my legs.

Getting your feet flat on the ground isn't all its hyped up to be. The low seat height on a Harley or clones is one of their attractions. A light bike helps a lot. I'm on tip toes on my BMW 750 but I can flat foot the Yamaha XT. Largely because the XT is narrower than the BMW though the seat height of the XT is just slightly higher. I learned to ride on heavy street bikes. The Yamaha XT225 was the first small light weight bike I ever owned and I found the light weight to be a blast. It's only fault is that at 60 -70 mph it is maxed out. No extra juice to accelerate away from situations I'd rather not be close to. But it's not made for interstate riding, at least not much of it.

Looking at the specs of the Yamaha XT225/250 you can see why it has almost a cult following in Japan. The fat tired Yamaha TW200 also has a huge following in Japan but not as much as the XT225/250. With the Kawasaki Super Sherpa a close second in this country. In Japan where they sell the XT in its Serow Mountain Trail version they make accessories that can only be found here for bikes like the BMW GS. Small and light weight has a lot of advantages. But in America the idea that bigger is better keeps this cool stuff from being marketed here. The Japanese makers of the accessories for these bikes won't even sell the stuff too you. They have a no export rule.

Checkout the nifty Serow Touring bike the Japanese can buy but we here cannot.

http://www.yamaha-motor.co.jp/mc/sportsbike/serow/touring/
http://www.ysgear.co.jp/mc/custom/xt250_serow.asp


They even threw a big 25th birthday party for the XT225/250 Serow in 2010. A hint at how popular a model it is in Japan.
http://www.ysptc.com/news/2010/07/serow-25th.html
http://blog.yamaha-motor.jp/2010/07/20100706-001.html

Anyway. The XT225/250 hits a sweet spot in specs.
Seat Height 31.9 inches ( no worries it decreases a lot when you sit on it)
Ground Clearance 11.2 inches
Wt 291 #

The Super Sherpa 250 is not far off this same sweet spot. A little taller, a little less ground clearance. But slightly lighter.
SH 32.7" GC 10.6" Wt 282#

Then you have the Yamaha WR250R
SH 36.6" GC 11.8" Wt 295#

The Honda CRF250L is another popular small dual sport bike. But wow
SH 34.7" GC 10" Wt 320#

Want a bit bigger engine for the highway or to haul a bigger body. The Suzuki DRZ400S is typical
SH 36.8" GC 11.8" Wt 317#
The DRZ400 SM: SH 35 GC 10.2: wt 321
Kawasaki KLR 650 : SH 35 GC 8.3" and Wt 452#

The V-Strom hits another sweet spot for a lot of folks for a highway capable dual sport bike, that cost a lot less than a BMW GS. Has tons of after market off road accessories too. With a SH of 32.9" it is doable for the inseam challenged, but its weight of 472# makes it more challenging.

It's when you go to the dedicated off road bikes that the seat height goes crazy. Up around 39 or 40 inches. There is a reason for that. We got into a discussion about seat height on the yahoo groups forum for the XT225 a few years ago. It has to do with stability from the period of moment arm. I forget the details but taller bike = more stable bike for serious off road riding.

Small displacement dual sport bikes can be a lot of fun and I would recommend them unless you need something bigger for long travel on interstate highways. A general rule of thumb is that you are safer if you can travel just a bit faster than the surrounding traffic and 200cc to 250cc just wont do that for you. But they are great for getting down little dirt roads :) and ok for the pavement between them.

John @ Tenkara USA wrote:I almost wish I'd never seen the Royal Enfield; it does sound perfect but it's just more than I want to spend, and I don't see the used ones going all that much cheaper, unless they're old enough they predate the newer engine you mentioned that I've read such good things about. Man, what a cool bike though. :) Thanks again!


Yep. It's almost a shame they improved the engine. Just a few years ago you could get a new one for around $4,100. But to own one it helped to be a good mechanic, not be in a hurry and have lots of patience. But hey, Jacqui Furneaux rode her pre-updated RE 40,000 + miles from Chennai, to Australia, S. America to Canada and home to Bristol. Reaching England just before new regulations would have barred the bike entry into the country.
http://jacquifurneaux.com/theenfield.htm

The saying is - You get an adventure ride when things don't go as well as planned.

This hasn't a thing to do with bikes and tenkara. Just one of my favorite Royal Enfield web pages. In 2003 Mike Rogero left Taiwan and went to India to tour all around on a RE. Great travelogue and ever better pictures.

http://www.onwalkabout.com/

The Road signs in the Himalayas are terrific too. And a good reminder to pay attention while riding
http://www.onwalkabout.com/features/indian_roadsigns.htm

And perhaps the best motorcycle film I've ever seen is Riding Solo to the Top of the World. Gaurav Jani rides and films alone for 70 days through the Himalayas on a RE 350. Seeing people and places seldom seen by outsiders. A wonderful film.
http://dirttrackproductions.com/ridingsolo.html

Gaurav is a member of the 60kph motorcycle traveling club of India. With a name like that you can guess the REs are not meant for going fast.

Anyway, good luck with what ever you get. Ride safe, wear protective gear. Two ways to survive - Either ride like no one can see you or ride like everyone can see you and they will try to hit you if they can. Avoid Blind Spots. And if I failed to mention it. Avoid Blind Spots. Have fun. Winter I assume comes early in Montana. Choose soon or be patient till spring. :roll:

D
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Re: Motorcycles and Tenkara

Postby John @ Tenkara USA » Sat Jul 06, 2013 9:20 am

Thanks again, D.

I'm going to look for Riding Solo at Hastings but I'll probably just have to order it. Looks awesome; I would love to do a trip like that riding and fishing through Montana and/or Yellowstone. Just drove through the Park over the 4th with my girlfriend and had to look at all the other people on their nice motorcycles. :)

I plan on wearing good protective gear and trying to be super careful, along with taking a motorcycle safety course before I even decide for sure to buy anything. You're very right that spring does come early here, so I've decided not to set a timeline. I really want to take the rider safety coarse this summer, but may wait to buy a bike. Prices go down big time in the winter so it might save me a lot of money to be patient. Still, I'd really like to get a bike this summer but we'll see what happens.

John
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Re: Motorcycles and Tenkara

Postby dwalker » Sun Jul 07, 2013 2:27 am

John

One thing that completely slipped my mind until this evening when I was looking around on youtube at various dual sport riding videos is lowering links to reduce seat height.

Then I recalled discussions several years ago about Kouba links for people who wanted to lower the seat height of BMW650 motorcycles. That is when I first heard of Kouba links. Basically you change the lnks ( generally a couple of dog bone shaped pieces of metal but sometimes different ) at the front end of the swing arm and then you may also have to make some other adjustments to restore balance to the bike's geometry. Chain sag, maybe adjust the front forks in the triple clamps, etc.

Anyway, Kouba links aren't the only game in town. Other companies make lowering links for different models of mc. Kouba links are made in USA and they also make links for several other models of mc besides BMW. Heck they even make some links for some Gas Gas models. ( Gas Gas is a Spanish company , I have a GG200 Trials mc, But trials mc certainly don't need lowering links. :roll:

Mine looks like this one, but it's beat up a lot more. I can't say it has a low seat because it doesn't have one. :shock:
http://www.gasgas.com/Gas-Gas-Media/2003-bikes/200-pro-yel-side.gif
Image

Here is webpage for the F650 Kouba link that it states lowers the rear of the bike by 1.5 inches.
http://www.koubalink.com/BMWF650CS.html

Another company that makes lowering links for Yamaha bikes is Yamalink. If you do a google search for Yamalink it will take you to
http://www.motorcycleloweringlinks.com/index.php?content=yamaha-lowering-link

The price listed is $170 and it states it lowers the rear by 1.6" /41mm. They also further claim it increases traction.

And a link to a 2 minute video showing how to install the link in a Yamaha WR250R ( the same model bike posted by tpalka earlier in this thread)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3YpC4pyOSSc

For fun - I did a google search for " Yamaha XT250 lowering links" - the search results had links to different companies selling different type of lowering links for the same model mc. As well as links to different blogs or forums post where the results were discussed for installing the links on this model of motorcycle. Such as advrider, thumpertalk, horizons unlimited ,xt225, and other popular forums.

This company had lowering links at a lower price and had a fairly long list of links for different models of Japanese bikes, excluding Honda.
http://www.soupysperformance.com/catalog/item/4408900/4393129.htm
They state that their adjustable lowering link will adjust the height of a Kawasaki KLR650 from standard height to 4 inch drop. Even more if you call them.

Just an idea of what is available. I'm sure many more suppliers can be found.

Point is - lowering links are not just made for dual sport bikes, they are also made for street bikes too. If you have a specific model of motorcycle in mind but you are concerned it might be to tall just google the "model name + lowering links" and find out if links are available and the cost. Maybe it would keep you from bypassing a model that interest you.

fwiw,
D
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Re: Motorcycles and Tenkara

Postby Nighteyes77 » Sat Jul 30, 2016 7:44 pm

I'm new to the forum and fishing and I really hate to revive dead threads but did you ever end up purchasing a bike? I live in Bozeman and I really love riding here. I'm originally from New York and would never have thought about a motorcycle there. The first thing I did when I moved to Bozeman was take the Beginner Rider Course and purchase a bike.

A few days ago I rode my little Suzuki into Hyalite to fish. It was my first time Tenkara fishing and it was a perfect experience.
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Re: Motorcycles and Tenkara

Postby outdoor.mne » Sun Jul 31, 2016 12:49 pm

I ride Honda Varaadero Xl 1000cc
That is a great bike for ride to soome mountain small river in mu country...

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Motorcycles and Tenkara

Postby johnjmcmullen » Wed Aug 03, 2016 7:44 am

Here's a pic of my 05 F650 GS BMW parked along the Dana Fork in Yosemite.


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Re: Motorcycles and Tenkara

Postby dwalker » Wed Aug 03, 2016 2:31 pm

Cool, after seeing many F650 GS bikes at BMW-RA rallies I had a hankering to buy one but never did.
afaik they were Aprila Pegaso's with some BMW tweeks to the engine and other parts.

http://www.motorcyclenews.com/bike-reviews/aprilia/pegaso-factory/2007/

Lately the CSC RX3 Adventure bike has caught my eye as a cool little bike to ride to a favorite Tenkara spot.
Not really classified as a dual sport bike like my current small Yamaha XT225.

http://www.cscmotorcycles.com/v/vspfiles/templates/neon/images/homepage/categories-RX3.jpg

Image

http://www.cscmotorcycles.com/CSC-Motorcycles-RX3-Adventure-p/zrx3.htm

I think it's not an accident that they make them to resemble the BMW GS bikes. And of course it's a different beast.
A 250ccc bike built by Zongshen in China. But it's getting a lot of good reviews, and some short comings from reviews a year ago have either been corrected or can be with optional parts made available by the Calif. importer. So they are listening to what people want. A 350 ~ 400 cc version would make it little better for longer rides on faster roads. And those crazy capable Brits showed it's possible and the better choice to ride round the world on 350cc Suzuki in Mondo Enduro and Terra Circa.

http://www.mondoenduro.com/

But I have no good excuse to buy another bike, or sell one of the ones I have to make room for one of them.
But after I get my son through school, maybe I'll find an excuse to justify it. :o
Small light bikes can be a lot of fun, and at ~ 78mpg , you can go far at low fuel cost.

Anyway, I'm toying around with the idea of going to Tenkara Jam this fall, and if I go - riding on a mc, 750 RT or XT225. The BMW would be the better choice for the 350 mile ride down, but doable on the XT, interstate highways can be avoided, and the smaller bike might have advantages once there. And it would be a different kind of ride. Maybe more in the spirit of Tenkara, nothing simplifier than a thumper. ;)

D
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