Sign In | Sign Up to Shop/Forum

Origin of the term "sakasa kebari"

Tenkara is a new type of fishing to the US, and information (particularly in English) is sparse. This is the place to build a knowledge base of Tenkara.

Re: Origin of the term "sakasa kebari"

Postby dwalker » Fri Mar 21, 2014 2:41 am

Paul Gaskell wrote:As ever David, great content there.

I can help out a bit on the gyaku-biki/hiki front;

Dr. Ishigaki read this blog post/talked about it with our mutual friend Steven and Ishigaki-san was very amused because he had learned the word "rendaku" from two English guys who were wrestling to try and learn stuff about the awkward Japanese language used in tenkara :) He blogs about it here: http://aitech.ac.jp/~ishigaki/tenkara/2013/England1.htm
..
In fact, a friend of ours from Wales tells us that the same principle also operates in the Welsh language...

Rendaku is something that definitely comes into play with the descriptions of basic tenkara presentation techniques that we have incorporated into our syllabus - see "Progression Stage 2 on here: http://www.discovertenkara.co.uk/tenkara-syllabus/

From talking with Dr. Ishigaki and Steven, the phonetic pronunciations that we have written down are the ones used verbally in Japan and they conform to the usual rendaku rules. We were also very fortunate to be able to quiz Dr. Ishigaki very closely about the correct hand/knuckle and rod-tip placements for each manipulation (as well as cadence and magnitude of movements of the line and kebari).
As one aside, the term "ogi-biki" (a less common description of "yoko-biki") sounds more like "onyi" or "oni" - and refers to a traditional Japanese fan. This is to help imply that the path of the "pulsed" kebari is a curved one - rather than a perfectly straight line.


Hi Paul, Interesting stuff. I look at Dr. Ishgaki's blog once in a while. I look at a lot of Japanese Tenkara websites. To learn and just for the fun of the challenge to see if I can figure stuff out.

Often the translations are quit amusing too. Some webpages translate into English quit well. Some not very well. I've basically concluded it has to do with the writing style of the author. I have always found Dr Ishgaki's blog post very difficult to make sense of. However, I did read through the the 6 England post the other day as best I could. One of them provided some amusement, in the initial translation, it described John's wife as a smart ass. But not worry, each of the alternate translations for the phase were all closer to translating the the phrase as "well informed". :)

I think deciphering Japanese is a lot easier than figuring out Welch. A very confusing written language. (arddull hynafol o bysgota plu japanese). And I have a bit of Welch DNA and it is of no help. My grandmother's maiden name was Craddock. And she was likely descended from Sam or Walter who landed in Virginia in 1701 and 1719. Only guessing from family history that indicates her family was here in the 1700s and did not loiter round the towns but pushed westward.
http://www.houseofnames.com/craddock-family-crest

You can find a lot of descriptive terms on Japanese Tenkara websites. Though sometimes it takes a while to figure them out. Sometimes converting the Kanji to hiragana or katakana to see how it translates helps, but often the descriptive terms reveal themselves when you split the overall phrase onto separate lines written in the different syllabaries.

In 2006 Sebata Yuzo posted an article of a suggested Tenkara line made from Kencraft ( Airflo in the USA) shooting line.

http://www.ukeikai.com/a_others/tenkara_t/t04/tenkara_t04.html

It has this interesting sentence"
4.5㍍のラインを作るには、まずランニングラインを4㍍でカットし、先には4号50㌢ほどのフロロカーボンラインを結び、その先に1.5号のナイロンハリスまたはフロロカーボンはリスを矢引き(1㍍)から一ヒロ(1.5㍍)を結ぶだけである。

Which google translates this way:

To make a line of 4.5 meters, cut in 4 meters running line first, and signed ( = connected to) a fluorocarbon line of about 50 ㌢ No. 4 ahead ( = on the end) , beyond that Ya-biki fluorocarbon or nylon Harris of 1.5 No. (1 squirrel meters it is only connecting (1.5 meters) from one Hilo).

Here 矢引き phonetically and into English shows up a Ya-biki. Not as Ya-hiki. As it does with 逆引き.
But what is a 矢引き , Ya-biki?

And what is 一ヒロ, One Hilo, (phonetically Ichi Hiro) ?

And what is 1 squirrel meters? When separated out the phrase becomes
リスを矢引き(1㍍), Risu o yabiki (1 ㍍) , Ya-biki (1 meters) the squirrel. Following the word order as written in Japanese it would be - squirrel yabiki ( 1meter).

Eventually I found a page that defined fishing terms. And ヒロ , Hiro. Was defined as the arm span of a fisherman. It also defined it as ひとひろ , Hito Hiro. I knew hito refers to a person.
Which if you divide it onto 2 separate lines it becomes:
ひと , Hito. Person
ひろ , Hiro, Fathom. Well anyone who has spent time near the sea knows what a Fathom is. ;)

The page that defined ヒロ, Hiro also mentioned that a 矢引き, Ya-biki. was 1/2 Hiro.

It was only later that I discovered that if I split 矢引き on to separate lines I was rewarded with:
矢 , Ya Arrow
引き, Hiki , Pull or Draw.
Which would be 1/2 Hiro. :)

The last mystery was what is a Squirrel? It was as the most difficult. I finally decided it was probably a typo, a missing character for Harisu/ aka tippet. Adding the missing bit ( ハ, ha) the phase becomes
ハリスを矢引き(1㍍) , Harisu o yabiki (1 ㍍) , Ya-biki (1 meters) Harris ( = tippet)
Or in the word order as written in Japanese. Harisu Yabiki ( 1 meter).

As it turns out the 1meter in parenthesis, was already telling that a Yabiki = about 1m. The same was true for 一ヒロ(1.5㍍), 1 Hiro = about 1.5m. A bow pull or an arm span length.
A new, old way, of measuring the length of our Tenkara lines. :roll:

btw- 長, naga = length.
(note: if you do a google search with リス, risu. You find pictures of Squirrels) :shock:

And ㌢ is just a stacked way of writing センチ, Senchi, centimeter.
And ㍍ , which did translate ok , is メートル, Mētoru, meters.

Interesting point about "yoko-biki" , and perhaps a clue to why I find Dr Ishigaki's blog post difficult to translate in a way that is readable. He may use a lot of common short-cut words.

On his bottom diagram in the screen shot from the video he labels it with this text
用引き, Yō hiki. or Yō biki.

I found 3 ways to write yoko. よこ , 横, translates as side or width. ヨコ, translates as horizontal or lateral.
Adding 引き to each. よこ引き, 横引き , ヨコ引き , each defaults to Crosscut. or alternately side, horizontal or lateral pulling.
None of the forms of Yōko, with the long ō sound, I found had anything to do with sideways pulling.

Dr Ishigaki labeling his diagram with 用引き, probably points to another thing that makes reading Japanese difficult.( and probably his blog post) In my brief study of written Japanese I have learned they often write things in a short-cut manner. In a way that uses different text from the complete way of writing the same thing. I suppose it is like writing "do not or don't". But when this is done in written Japanese they often use completely different words that seem to have no relationship to the words used when it is written out completely. It takes a deeper study of the language to catch the meaning of these alternate, short-cut phrases for the same thing. And the title on his diagram may have been written with one of those short-cuts. Yō in place of Yoko. :?

btw- I've ordered your DVD one week ago. Maybe you've thrown in a few more Japanese terms for me to learn. I hope it will deliver in another week. ;)

D
Tenkara is fundamental fishing fun
dwalker
 
Posts: 1055
Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2010 12:23 pm
Location: W.b.g.V.

Re: Origin of the term "sakasa kebari"

Postby dwalker » Mon Mar 24, 2014 9:08 pm

Back in the day when I made submarine patrols, to pass the time of long boring 6 hours watch periods, we would sometime play word games. If I held the dictionary I would pick an obscure word, then give a definition of the word.

The other participants would vote whether the definition I gave was correct. Or if the definition I gave was just a story that sounded plausible as being the correct definition. Though it was totally Bogus Sport. If you voted for the correct definition you scored 1 point. If I gave a convincing story that was incorrect and you fell for the bogus definition, I scored 2 points. If you didn't think I gave a correct definition and I also failed to convince you to believe the bogus definition, you score 2 points.

Today's word is 逆 . Why is it written this way and what do the different parts mean?
We already know that as a whole it means upside down or inverted or reverse (hackle). Or that is what it means when connected to -
けばり、毛鉤、毛針、毛バリ、毛バリ。Kebari. Or 毛鈎 , Ke kagi.

The radical on the left , ⻌ ,
is a simplified form of 辶 or 辵 . Which means; walk or walking. Though when it is used with other Kanji it is best to think of it in a broader conceptual way, such as connecting two points or some interaction between two places, two things or two people on a path between destinations. As an example. 追加 means Adding or Addition, a path connecting 2 numbers. Or on Tenkara webpages you might see 道糸, michiito, as the label for the fishing line. It will get translated, probably incorrectly as ; road thread or road yarn, or even street or way yarn. 道, michi has the same ⻌ radical on the left side.

屮 can mean Sprout. However, Wikipedia also says that in Hiragan it is てつ, Tetsu, Iron. Tetsu is also 鉄. Despite Wikipedia equating it to iron most other places I looked at only equate 屮 to sprout or sprout with leaves.

The radical on top is a pictogram for Grass or weeds, herbs, etc.

屮 + 䒑 = 屰 , that a Chinese etymology web page says means an upside down person. A pictogram for inverted person. Or also possibly deceased person. :shock:

⻌ + 屰 conveys the idea of a person walking backwards. Or going backwards. Inverted. Or even being disobedient or contrary.

references:
⻌ = Kanji radical # 162
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E8%BE%B5#Translingual
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_of_Japanese_kanji_radicals
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radical_162


http://www.chineseetymology.org/CharacterEtymology.aspx?submitButton1=Etymology&characterInput=%E5%B1%AE
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E5%B1%AE


http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E4%92%91


http://www.chineseetymology.org/CharacterEtymology.aspx?submitButton1=Etymology&characterInput=%E5%B1%B0

Image

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E5%B1%B0


http://www.chineseetymology.org/CharacterEtymology.aspx?submitButton1=Etymology&characterInput=%E9%80%86
and
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E9%80%86

Wherein it list 逆
in On'Yomi ( Chinese reading ) as ぎゃく , gyaku , reverse
in Kun'Yomi ( Japanese reading) as さからう , Sakarau, go against

Whether the Kanji is read as On'Yomi or Kun'Yomi seems to be another complication of how Japanese is read that compliments the Rendaku , sequential voicing , mentioned earlier by Paul Gaskel.

Although I am personally not too concerned with how Japanese is pronounced only in how to read it. I think reading and speaking Japanese are two different skills. And I doubt I will ever have need to talk to someone in Japanese. However, understanding On'Yomi, Kun'Yomi and Rendaku would probably go a long way in understanding the written text and the phonics and why it changes a lot, depending upon surrounding text.

For more information about On'Yomi and Kun'Yomi see:
http://www.tofugu.com/2010/03/23/the-types-of-kanji-in-japanese-onyomi-vs-kunyomi/
and
http://www.learn-japanese-adventure.com/how-to-determine-onyomi-and-kunyomi-of-each-kanji-character.html

Rendaku written in Japanese is pretty interesting. 連濁 . Note that the first character, which can mean communication, also has the ⻌ on the left. Somewhat indicating a walk of ideas between two people.

連濁 will initially translate as "Sequential Voicing"
But an alternate translation is " Euphonic change of unvoiced to voiced sound"
Euphony is defined as -
the quality of being pleasing to the ear, esp. through a harmonious combination of words.

Thus trying to read Japanese gets complicated by Rendaku, On-Yomi, Kun'Yomi, the common practice of shortening written text, and a lot of other things. No wonder a lot gets lost in translation. :shock:

None of this helps you catch a fish or make a more perfect cast, or tie a kebari the fish can not resist. I just find it interesting. :roll:

So, how did you vote? That I gave a correct construction of 逆 ? Or did I only tell a convincing story of how it came to mean what it has become to mean that was bogus? Or did I give a false definition and failed to convince you it was a correct construction ? :?

:ugeek:
D
Tenkara is fundamental fishing fun
dwalker
 
Posts: 1055
Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2010 12:23 pm
Location: W.b.g.V.

Re: Origin of the term "sakasa kebari"

Postby Paul Gaskell » Fri Mar 28, 2014 3:23 am

David, we should definitely hang out when John and I eventually get ourselves over to the US - I really enjoyed reading your stuff on that and it is great to find someone else who understands the fascination and sometime frustration with trying to tease apart source Japanese material!

I love the "bow-draw" derivation of a unit of distance :) and the only thing that I might have offered during that part of your detective work might have been that I have come across "hiki-otoshi" in aikido (a technique pulling your opponent forwards and dropping downwards to break their balance). Great job though on drilling down, very satisfying.

I can't actually post some of the random translations thrown up by google translate of Japanese tenkara writings (based on probabilistic combinations of occurrence/usage online rather than pure linguistic rules!) because I hear that "quite a lot" of the internet is devoted to "adult" material....totally obscene but very funny though.

I am sure other non-Japanese tenkara fans have started to build up their stock translations of common mistranslations (Hair Bali or Bali for "kebari", Harris for "harisu"/tippet etc.)
Paul Gaskell
 
Posts: 58
Joined: Fri Nov 04, 2011 5:08 am

Re: Origin of the term "sakasa kebari"

Postby dwalker » Sat Mar 29, 2014 1:17 am

Paul Gaskell wrote:David, we should definitely hang out when John and I eventually get ourselves over to the US - I really enjoyed reading your stuff on that and it is great to find someone else who understands the fascination and sometime frustration with trying to tease apart source Japanese material!
..


Thanks Paul. Yes that would be fun if locations worked out. :)
It would be cool if you could post a couple of pictures of John's kebari to my review of your Introduction to Tenkara DVD. I think people would like them. I did. :)
http://tenkarausa.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=5132&sid=2ccf2d4d7dd8c56bbb9b2282cfe14a4f

You being a freshwater ecologists you might like this story. I just discovered that 2 hours south of me is a warm water stream where wild Rainbow and Brown trout thrive on their own. Or at least they do over a several mile length of the river. The river is not stocked. Rainbow trout were dumped into the river 30 years ago after a fish stocking truck, on its way to a different river, broke down on a hot summer day. The driver had to either let the fish die or put them into the closest river. Surprisingly the trout thrived, largely due to cold water entering the river from old abandoned coal mines that keeps the water cold enough through summer for them to survive year round. It helped a lot that the mines had supplied very low sulfur content coal and the water runs over limestone before entering the river. A few years later Brown trout were introduced to see how they would fare, and they thrived on their own too. Some Trout Unlimited members have reported catching over 100 trout in one day's fishing. And 26 to 32 inch trout have been caught in the river. Here is a picture of a local TU member with a trout caught fly fishing the river. Though I'm sure most are more Tenkara size. :) Maybe I will find out myself. Though I have read there was a major fish kill due to diesel being spilled into the river. But I am not sure how long ago that happened. None of the articles I found that mentioned it were dated.

Image


Paul Gaskell wrote:
I love the "bow-draw" derivation of a unit of distance :) and the only thing that I might have offered during that part of your detective work might have been that I have come across "hiki-otoshi" in aikido ..

I suppose 弓 in some way symbolizes a compound bow, the same radical is used in the kanji for Arc too.
http://kanjidamage.com/kanji/892-bow-%E5%BC%93

Aikido is an interest martial art. I've read a lot about it. Tried it out one evening years ago. After getting tossed around on the mat for 2 hours, every which way but upright, my digestive system was very unhappy for several days afterward. I still read about it but decided Tai Chi is more my speed. I recall there is one technique or throw called the 40 Year Technique, because they say it takes 40 years to learn to do it properly. George Leonard wrote a great book based around his experience earning an Aikido black belt at age of 50 , titled Mastery. The book is more about Mastering any undertaking. Practice is not something you do, it is something you have, and learning to love the plateau were his main points to make progress.


Paul Gaskell wrote:..
I can't actually post some of the random translations thrown up by google translate of Japanese tenkara writings ......totally obscene but very funny though....


Google translate also causes troubles for the Japanese too. There is some term I come across on some Tenkara pages that will translate into probably the most famous taboo 4-letter word. One evening while trying to figure out what it should translate into in English I found a picture of a large department store in Tokyo, were the manager had google translated some sales pitch into English from Japanese. Printed it in 2 foot tall lettering in English on a banner - hung on the front of the store. Well he mistakenly used the offending word on his banner. :shock: :oops:

Paul Gaskell wrote:....I am sure other non-Japanese tenkara fans have started to build up their stock translations of common mistranslations (Hair Bali or Bali for "kebari", Harris for "harisu"/tippet etc.)


You can keep list and they are helpful in the beginning. But I have discovered an easier way. That is, if you can recall how certain Japanese words show up in the phonetic spelling below the Japanese window.

Here is how it works. Set the left window to Japanese. The right window to English. In the lower left corner of the Japanese widow you will see the Japanese Hiragana for A , あ. Click on the down arrow next to it and you are offered 2 options. The top one, あ konnichiwa , if you click it , you can type in the the word you want in Romaji phonetic spelling and get the word in Japanese. Before you hit Enter to accept the displayed spelling, if you touch the space bar, a window will open giving you a list to choose from. If you already know the Japanese by sight you can select the correct spelling. You only need to know a couple of tricks for some words.

Some examples:
Just type in kebari, hit the space bar, and you will get a list with several different ways Kebari is written in Japanese. Choose the one you want and hit enter. If you just choose the top spelling, けばり, below the window, you will see in red lettering Do You Mean: and next to it is the most common spelling, 毛鉤, written in blue. If you click it, that spelling will transfer to the window. Or if you hit the space bar , the popup window will offer you these other spellings in the list. 毛鉤、毛バリ、毛ばり、毛針、ケバリ。

The same with Tenkara. Type it in and you can find these different ways of writing it : てんから、テンカラ、天から、点から and several others. The last one is phonetically -ten kara, so it is not what you want. The first 3 I have seen used on Tenkara web pages. No matter which one you choose, if you try to do a google search with it, Google will suggest the more common spelling.

Line is a little different. Phonetically is is RAIN. But Japanese doesn't have just N. I you type in RAIN, you get , らいn. But type in RAINN, and you get らいん、ライン. I know the second one , ライン, is the one you want.

Want Level Line. type in reberurainn. and you get レベルライン. Level is reberu.

Keiryu is really Keiryū , with the long U sound. Often to make a long sound, of whatever letter, you add another U = う, at the end. To get keiryu you would type in keiryuu. The same with Seiryu or Genryu or Honryu. 渓流、清流、源流、本流。

To wind a fly or wind line on your spool, it is Maki. Type it in and you can quickly get 巻 at the top, but usually you will want it written this way, 巻き. But this is an interesting one. If you type in Maki and select 巻 it is one of the cases where below the English window, you will see that 巻 is listed as a noun, and below it are several options for different. Likewise if you select 巻き it will say it is an adjective. Though I don't think it always list the words correctly whether they are nouns, verbs or adjectives.

However, if you are really wanting the term for winding a kebari, just copy and past 毛鉤巻き( Kebari-maki, fly-wound) into a google search window and google will suggest 毛鉤巻き方 ( Kebari maki-kata , Winding fly or you can see alternative translations by pasting it into a translation window and clicking on the English word in the English window, were it offers: Way of winding fly, Wrapping fly, etc. Other alternate phrases using the same terms will be seen in some of the titles of the search results.

Want 竿, type in - sao, and 竿 shows up in the list. Notice below the English window. Noun, Rod or Pole and several alternate Japanese spellings to choose from.

Shikake can be a term used for how the line is rigged or even for a line spool. Type it in, select the usual way it is written from the pop up window, 仕掛け. Notice the long list of alternates below the English window.

Tippet is harisu, just type it in to get ハリス.

Taperedline line is Tēpārain. With this word you don't add a u, う, to make the long ē, or ā. With this word you add a Dash - . Type in te-pa-rainn to get テーパーライン.

Want to look for how to make a homemade or self made or hombrewed taper line or shikake. Type in Jikasei or Jisaku, 自家製 or 自作. Doesn't matter to much if you get the syntax correct. Get something close and paste it into a google search window and google will suggest the correct way.

Try 自作仕掛け and one google suggestion is 釣り 自作仕掛け, Want results for tenkara just add Tenkara to the search term テンカラ釣り 自作仕掛け.

Do a google search for テンカラテーパーライン自作, tenkar taper line own, and google will accept it as is. But then remove 自作 and google might suggest :
テンカラテーパーライン仕掛け tenkar taper line gimmick
テンカラテーパーラインの作り方 how to make tenkara taper line
テンカラテーパーライン作り方 tenkara taper line how to make

Or substitute テンカラ毛鉤 tenkara kebari
テンカラ毛鉤の作り方 How to make Tenkara fly

or just type in sakasa to get 逆さ. Add to the above phrase to get
テンカラ逆さ毛鉤の作り方 how to make fly upside down

Tsuri is Fishing ,釣り. Note under English window it will say noun. Though I think it is a verb, but it will suggest about 6 alternate ways to write it in Japanese.

sakana is Fish, 魚. Note under English window. Noun and alternate spelling. フィッシュ, Fisshu.

I think that gives you the general idea of how it works. You do not need a document with saved tenakara terms in Japanese or crazy google translations.

You can find all kinds of ways of writing different terms right off the google translate window. And with combinations of several of the above terms you can find almost anything you want to find. Get the syntax wrong and google will suggest what is most often searched for. However, google will also give results based on your own search history. Your search results will be different from mine. Figuring out what the is written on the webpages you find is another adventure. :roll:

Almost forgot to also mention that the other option in the drop down window gives you the option to draw the kanji in the window or draw the hiragan or katakana. If the kanji is not to complex, it will recognize it and you can select one of several suggestions. However, it doesn't recognize a lot of simple kanji. It's list seems to be limited.

fwiw,
D
Tenkara is fundamental fishing fun
dwalker
 
Posts: 1055
Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2010 12:23 pm
Location: W.b.g.V.

Re: Origin of the term "sakasa kebari"

Postby Paul Gaskell » Mon Mar 31, 2014 4:10 am

More great stuff David (and I promise I'll try to devote the time that it deserves to have a bash at your definitions game!).

In case of interest, I've put up a short video and some explanatory text talking about both the value of seeking out the obscure holding spots for fish as well as the tremendous privilege of being able to explore ideas with people who relate to a shared experience, but who do not share your spoken language...

http://www.discovertenkara.co.uk/steven-the-human-communications-hub-and-the-places-less-fished/
Paul Gaskell
 
Posts: 58
Joined: Fri Nov 04, 2011 5:08 am

Re: Origin of the term "sakasa kebari"

Postby dwalker » Mon Mar 31, 2014 1:23 pm

I forgot to add that if you have an iPad you can also type in romaji to get the Japanese text.

Go to settings/ general / keyboard. Turn on Split Keyboard + click Keyboards / Add New Keyboard enable Japanese Romaji keyboard.

Next to the space bar on the keyboard will be a globe. Touch it to switch between English input or Romaji input. You might open google with the English keyboard. Then enter your search term with the Romaji input. For example as you type in "sakasa kebari" boxes will appear at the top of the keyboard offering you different ways of writing 'sakasa kebari'. Tap the box with the spelling you want to use. ;)

Paul Gaskell wrote:More great stuff David (and I promise I'll try to devote the time that it deserves to have a bash at your definitions game!). ...

Well, you have to keep in mind that you score double points if you convenience the other person to believe a definition that isn't true, it just sounds like it might be true due to using correct definitions of root parts of the word. The object is not to convenience people of a lie, like a politician. :o But to get them to think by telling a convincing story, like making them believe a fairy tale is true , yet they can't figure out how to refute it with out thinking carefully. :? OTOH , nothing wrong with going for single points. :)


Paul Gaskell wrote:...In case of interest, I've put up a short video and some explanatory text talking about both the value ..... as well as the tremendous privilege of being able to explore ideas with people who relate to a shared experience, but who do not share your spoken language...


Steven Wheeler has the same verbal juggling skills as a local young Chinese woman, the owner of a Chinese restaurant. Most of her business is take away meals. I often go at the lunch time peak to marvel at her skill. She does all these things simultaneously : takes my order, while handing back change to another customer, while calling over her shoulder in Chinese to the cooks of what to cook next, while taking a call-in order on the phone, while telling another employee in Chinese she needs more paper bags or chop sticks brought to the front counter. I don't know how she does it - but I have never seen anyone storm in complaining she got their order wrong. :o

I'm sure his skill at listening or speaking in two languages at the same time was an asset to Dr. Ishigaki's visit. Amazing that he correctly detected the stream had recently been fished.

D
Tenkara is fundamental fishing fun
dwalker
 
Posts: 1055
Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2010 12:23 pm
Location: W.b.g.V.

Re: Origin of the term "sakasa kebari"

Postby Paul Gaskell » Tue Apr 01, 2014 11:58 am

I run a couple of PC laptops - but on one of them I've got an IME installed (that lets me type the phonetic sounds of the characters - and then displays them as hiragana, katakana or offers options of several kanji). I can read hiragana and katakana and I've started to learn kanji but, man, there are a LOT of them!! and they all have several meanings....
Paul Gaskell
 
Posts: 58
Joined: Fri Nov 04, 2011 5:08 am

Previous

Return to About Tenkara

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest