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Daniel: Questions while in Japan about tenkara culture?

Tenkara is a new type of fishing to the US, and information (particularly in English) is sparse. This is the place to build a knowledge base of Tenkara.

Re: Daniel: Questions while in Japan about tenkara culture?

Postby dwalker » Wed Jun 15, 2011 10:28 am

Take a look at Daniel's Hoba Sushi Festival video if you haven't seen it yet. More pictures, video and music.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8w0f4c-XlUA&NR=1

This year we missed a local event held on Memorial Day. At the largest local cemetery on each grave is placed a candle inside a paper bag with sand in the bottom. They are all lit after dark and it is a very moving sight. I don't know the candle count. A few thousand at most not close to ten thousand. All of them can not be seen at one view due to rolling terrain. My son and I for the previous 3 years have been involved with the set up work due to Boy Scouts or him being on student council. Its a nice event when conditions cooperate. One year after all the setup work heavy rain set in as darkness fell so a disappointing end. Luckily you were blessed with clear weather the night of the Hoba Sushi Festival.
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Re: Daniel: Questions while in Japan about tenkara culture?

Postby tnitz » Wed Jun 15, 2011 10:40 am

OK, since you offered...

Does anyone know what type of glue (or other system) was used traditionally to glue the spliced hoop of a tamo? Maybe they weren't glued at all, I don't know.
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Re: Daniel: Questions while in Japan about tenkara culture?

Postby dwalker » Wed Jun 15, 2011 11:32 am

Daniel @ TenkaraUSA wrote:... 10- Often when I watch ..videos from Japan... - I hear the tinkle of a small bell as the people in the video walk or fish...I've been wondering what the wearing of a small bell means in the culture.
- I still haven't seen or noticed that. The person that I'm here with says they are bear bells. There are a lot of bears in Japan. These are relatively aggressive bears, and present in many different areas..


The one catalog entry I found about a small bell to attach to a back pack only mentioned the bell as having a pleasing sound. Nothing about the bell being intended as a bear alert. Therefore I assumed the bells were worn for some spiritual, tradition or cultural reason. Actually I never thought of bears being an issue in Japan.

I found a 2007 article from the UK about concern over the future of the Asiatic Black bear in Japan. Japan just as here in the USA has had a dramatic drop in the number of hunters. No hunters means predator animals lose their fear of man and other factors can lead to aggressive encounters. What was most astounding in the UK article was that an estimated 30% to 50% of the black bear population may have been killed in 2006. Due to low food in the forest the bears enter towns and conflicts arise.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2 ... redspecies

A more recent 2010 article shows that bear encounters in towns in Japan continues. Four killed and ~ 80 wounded. I hesitate to post this link because to many news media want to say every bad thing that happens is due to climate change caused by man. = B.S.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... hange.html

At least this one , with video, questions the blame climate change mantra.
http://www.theawl.com/2010/10/bears-attack-japan

Bears encounters a problem in Japan. Who knew ?

Well , at least - Now I know why I haven't been reading any reports about how UL camping gear worked out. ;) :( :roll:
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Re: Daniel: Questions while in Japan about tenkara culture?

Postby Eddie » Wed Jun 15, 2011 10:30 pm

That bell is just for keeping bears away.

Fishers and hikers are advised to wear a bell when they deeply go into the mountains, where bears lives. But I do not wear a bell. Japanese bears, except brown bears in northern Island of Hokkaido, are a herbivore and not very dangerous. For me, they are one of our friends in the forest. They are dangerous only when they and we suddenly meet face to face.

I actually meet a bear twice in these 20 years of my fishing career, but it was not very scary. They were cute and beautiful friends.

In these days, major part of the forest is planted with conifers like cedar and cypress, and there is not much food for them. In particular, just before they go into hibernation, they come out to the country side for food. They know that there is much food where peoples live.

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Re: Daniel: Questions while in Japan about tenkara culture?

Postby jayfisher » Thu Jun 16, 2011 12:49 am

Daniel,

Thank you for your fascinating answers. I appreciate it!

And to everyone, thanks for the great discussion.

-Jack :)
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Re: Daniel: Questions while in Japan about tenkara culture?

Postby dwalker » Thu Jun 16, 2011 12:56 am

Eddie wrote:That bell is just for keeping bears away..
In these days, major part of the forest is planted with conifers like cedar and cypress, and there is not much food for them. In particular, just before they go into hibernation, they come out to the country side for food. They know that there is much food where peoples live. Eddie


Eddie, thank you for the insight into the change in the species of trees causing a change in the bear's habitat forcing a change in the places they have to search for food.

Perhaps you or Daniel could answer another question about a type of fishing or place of fishing that I have not been about to figure out. It is not specific to tenkara fishing. Perhaps it's just an odd google translation from Japanese.

I have found several references to " tan lining". Or うらたんざわ , Kanazawa tan lining.

I first saw this term on a youtube video, with the title :
うらたんざわ テンカラビッグファイト 2010年11月13日
That gets translated by google as
November 13, 2010, Kanazawa Tenkarabiggufaito ( tenkara big fight) tan lining
With a description saying :
うらたんざわ渓流釣り場にて Tan lining fishing rivers in Kanazawa
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbBzU9rNG_4

And also in a second tenkara video from the same guy 3 days later. Similar title
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNL6cq_CzWA


Another video talks about tan line fishing stream management
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKi7ZKs3WOw

Yet another older web site I found says:
"If fishing rivers Kanazawa tan lining, " also known as blue tongue.
「うらたんざわ渓流釣場」通称青タン
http://www.tomochika.com/blog2/archives ... ost_6.html
With the post title being 'Kanazwa stream fishing tan lining'
Though this site is not using tenkara gear.

A Yoshikinoko tenkara diary entry from January 2011, also talks about Kanazawa tan lining stream fishing
http://translate.google.com/translate?h ... 74310.html


Tan lining or blue tongue, is not specific to tenkara, but tenkara gear gets used for tan lining.
But what is it? All the pictures seem to be on the same stream, dammed at intervals into deep pools. Other than that one clue. I haven't figured out just what tan lining is unless it has something to do with stocked fish or perhaps something else.

Thanks,
David
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Chris, I hope you might add a few of your thoughts also

Postby jayfisher » Thu Jun 16, 2011 1:13 am

Chris,

Welcome back. When you've managed to unpack and settle down, I hope you might enrich some of these topics with a few of your thoughts also.

-Jack
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Re: Daniel: Questions while in Japan about tenkara culture?

Postby CM_Stewart » Thu Jun 16, 2011 3:46 am

Unfortunately, I'm not able to add nearly as much as Daniel can in this discussion. The few days I had with other tenkara anglers were mostly filled with fishing, instruction, demonstrations and just the time involved with participating in the weekend's charity event. Unfortunately, much of that time was also spent with people who's English was about on par with my Japanese. You can learn a lot with sign language, but not the answers to the questions posed above.

I did very definitely get the sense that some tenkara anglers considered themselves students of Ishigaki-sensei, and some considered themselves students of Sakakibara-sensei. Regional differences never came up in our rather limited conversations. I know there are other teachers, but again, it never came up.

A lot of these kind of questions can only be answered if you have hours of one on one, with someone who speaks English or with a translator at hand, and the reason for the meeting is to ask questions rather than to go fishing.
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Re: Daniel: Questions while in Japan about tenkara culture?

Postby dwalker » Thu Jun 16, 2011 7:16 pm

As mentioned in a couple of previous post in this thread. Some tenkara fishers like to associate themselves with the teachings of one tenkara teacher or master or another.

Many activities in the orient that have been around for centuries often have a collection of proverbs giving guidance associated with that pursuit.

I have a couple of Japanese proverbs that I have remembered for years. Wish I could recall where I first read them. My favorite Japanese proverb, which I drop on my son from time to time, in the belief that it may serve him well some time during his life. Is about the value of perseverance when facing a difficult task or situation. It's a simple proverb - "Fall down seven, stand up eight."

I've read that historically Tenkara fishing was the activity of commercial fishermen. While tenkara fishing was the skill of a laborer. I'm sure they were intelligent men, just as others who built wooden ships or laid railroad tracks who often thought about their work and developed songs, sayings or proverbs to help them in their work or tell the story of their day to day work and lives.

Did the Tenkara fishermen not also have some literary or artistic tradition? I have a cd of Chinese folk song music about the harvesting of tea, as an example.

Are there any known sayings, folk songs, poems, stories or proverbs, etc. related to Tenkara fishing?

Even if there are I'm sure they would be quite difficult to access for people who do not read or speak Japanese. But, just curious.

Thanks,
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Re: Daniel: Questions while in Japan about tenkara culture?

Postby Eddie » Fri Jun 17, 2011 5:36 am

dwalker wrote:I have found several references to " tan lining". Or うらたんざわ , Kanazawa tan lining.

I first saw this term on a youtube video, with the title :
うらたんざわ テンカラビッグファイト 2010年11月13日
That gets translated by google as
November 13, 2010, Kanazawa Tenkarabiggufaito ( tenkara big fight) tan lining

David


Looks like machine translation troubles you a lot.

" tan lining" is just a mistranslation and is nonsense.

うらたんざわ テンカラビッグファイト 2010年11月13日 should have been translated as:
Uratanzawa tenkara big fight, November 13, 2010

"うらたんざわ" is a name of a place.

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