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Flies for High Sierra lakes?

A place to discuss techniques and rigging options for use in "non-mountain stream" areas such as lakes and warm-water areas, as well as non-traditional tenkara techniques such as nymphing.

Flies for High Sierra lakes?

Postby kcb_com » Tue Apr 21, 2015 7:25 am

Hi All,

I'm planning a trip to Sequoia NM this summer and would like to try for some golden & rainbow trout. These lakes are all high elevation 8k ft and up. Any suggestions as to which flies would work best?

KC
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Re: Flies for High Sierra lakes?

Postby Nagasaurus » Wed Apr 22, 2015 10:43 am

Ants are a great lake pattern and I always carry a few when hiking to mountain lakes. They are great fun to fish with as well when sight casting to cruisers close to shore.

http://www.west-fly-fishing.com/fly-pat ... gant.shtml
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Re: Flies for High Sierra lakes?

Postby kcb_com » Thu Apr 23, 2015 9:49 am

Very true! I never thought about using an ant. I was thinking grasshopper as well.

Thanks!

KC
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Re: Flies for High Sierra lakes?

Postby Karl Klavon » Fri Apr 24, 2015 8:36 am

Here is a piece I did in 2011 regarding the subject of effective fly patterns for fishing high mountain lakes as well as stream fishing: http://www.tenkarausa.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=2099
In addition to the information presented there, if you will scroll back a few pages or so, there are a number of posts put up on effective high lake patterns by other much better known angling authors, which ought to get you off and running on a fine and productive high lake fly fishing adventure.
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Re: Flies for High Sierra lakes?

Postby tsegelke » Sun May 03, 2015 8:14 am

Size 14 to 18 Kebari worked good for me last summer.
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Re: Flies for High Sierra lakes?

Postby chorpie » Sat May 09, 2015 7:17 pm

Karl, do you have instructions for tying your two-tone x-rated ant pattern?
Yong
Amago, 11' Iwana I, 12' Iwana II
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Re: Flies for High Sierra lakes?

Postby Karl Klavon » Wed May 13, 2015 8:01 am

THE TWO TONE X-RATED ANT PATTERN
Dark
HOOK: SIZE # 12 & 16 TMC 5212
THREAD: 6/0 BLACK
SHELL BACKS: BLACK/TAN GLUED TOGETHER CLOSED CELL FOAM
UNDER BODIES: PEACOCK HERL
LEGS: FINE & X FINE BLACK ROUND RUBBER LEG MATERIAL

INSTRUCTIONS FOR TYING THE TWO-TONED X-RATED ANT PATTERN:

1. Place your bent down barbed hook in the vise with most of the curve of the hook showing above the vice jaws. Tie the thread in at the point where the rear most body segment for our ant’s body will begin.

2. Tie in a strip of hook gape wide laminated tan/black closed cell foam, with the black side of the foam facing up, binding it down the hook shank to about half way around the curve of the hook. Razor Foam comes 4 sheets to a package, 2 at 0.5 and 2 at 1 mm. Buy a pack each of Black and Tan foam. 3M, 77 Spray Adhesive is used to flue the foam sheets together, gluing 1, 0.5 mm sheet of one color to 1, 1mm sheet of the other color together, or you can glue two sheets of the opposite colors of 2 mm closed foam together. The 2mm foam floats slightly better but is harder to work with and gives a slightly less attractive appearance to the finished fly.

3. Tie in 2 or 3 strands of peacock herl, by the butts, on top of the under body of foam, tied down and around the bend of the hook. Then wrap the thread back up to the tie in point. Wrap an under-body of peacock herl over the under body of foam, and tie it off. Clip the excess herl away at the thread but don’t discard the excess herl material at this time. The remainder will be used to make the slightly smaller head section on our X-rated Ant pattern. Using what is left over utilizes the natural taper in the herl to keep the head in the proper proportion to the abdomen on our X-rated Ant fly pattern.

4. Now, pull the shell back over the under body and tie it down under slight tension. Once it is secure, increase the tension on the foam while trimming the excess foam away with your scissors angled toward the rear of the hook at a 45 degree angle, forming a taper in the foam as it is severed. Now bind the stub end of the foam down to the hook shank as tightly as you can get it - tapering it down to the shank with thread tension as you go. Then, wrap your thread all the way up to the eye of the hook.

5. Now we will repeat the same process all over again, only working in reverse from the eye of the hook backwards, toward what will become the ant’s waist. Just as you did with the back body segment, repeating steps 1 through 4, but going from right to left this time instead of going from left to right, assuming you are right handed. After completing this second set of steps, you should end up with both of the ant’s body segments formed on the hook and the thread hanging on the bobbin at the narrowest portion of the ant’s waist.

6. Letting the thread hang from the weight of the bobbin at the narrowest point on the ant’s waist, take two previously cut 2 inch long or so rubber leg strips by their ends and slide them both up under the thread at the same time, until they are resting on the top of the hook shank. Release the legs and they should sit right where you left them, held in place by the tension on the thread from the weight of the bobbin.

7. Make three light turns of thread around the legs at their tie in point and then release the bobbin. Grasp each end of one leg strip and pull it down until it is on the side of the ant’s body. Then do the same with the other leg. Then make 3 firm thread wraps and do a whip finish, then trim the thread away.

8. Next, place a drop of head cement right on top of the securing thread wraps holding the legs in place, and let the cement to set up.

9. After the cement is set up, pull all the legs up over the top of the fly and pinch them in between your thumb and first finger of your left hand. Trim the excess leg material away by holding your scissors at a 45-degree angle to the hook shank so that the hind set of legs will end up being slightly longer than the fore legs will be after they are trimmed. Release the legs and view your ant pattern from above. It may be necessary to do a little additional trimming to even out each pair of legs for length. When you are satisfied with the appearance of your ant’s legs, your ant pattern is complete.
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Re: Flies for High Sierra lakes?

Postby chorpie » Wed May 13, 2015 1:35 pm

awesome, thanks!
Yong
Amago, 11' Iwana I, 12' Iwana II
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Re: Flies for High Sierra lakes?

Postby rsetina » Sun May 24, 2015 11:30 am

While float tubing in Mammoth Lakes I've tied on a Kebari behind a leech pattern. Out of 27 fish, 24 took the Kebari. Good luck!
Rick

テンカラ。小さなストリームのシンプルさ。
My Tenkara Rods:
13' Ayu, 12' Yamame, 11' with a conversion handle, and an Ito.

My Wife's Tenkara Rods:
12' Ebisu and 13.5' Amago, 12' Iwana with a conversion handle, and an Ito.
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