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Net gallery

PostPosted: Fri Oct 01, 2010 12:39 pm
by Daniel @ Tenkara USA
Just compiling a gallery of tenkara nets, please add your own or your own finds. I just added the ones I had readily available. A few of these nets are currently on their way from Japan to here!!! I'm really psyched to get them.

Also, if you're on Facebook, join the Tenkara Nets group: Tenkara Nets on FB

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Re: Net gallery

PostPosted: Fri Oct 01, 2010 2:49 pm
by patrickgarner
Oh my gosh. Absolutely gorgeous collection. I want them all!

These are a great new addition to western fishing tackle. The conventional trout nets we're all so used to look uncomfortable & clumsy in comparison to any of these.

Eloquent and individual works of art. Congratulations, Daniel!

Newest nets

PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 2:07 pm
by Daniel @ Tenkara USA
Just about done with the finish on 3 more nets, I'm very pleased with these ones. This brings the total to 11 finished nets, plus 3 waiting for final sanding and finish and a couple more drying at the moment.

All nets I have made now feature my Kanji name characters. Dr. Ishigaki is not only a tenkara master, but also a masterful wordsmith. My friend, Masaki, says he's like a rapper, and is always playing with words, using words that sound very similar but have different meanings. He found the characters for my name (Da-ni-e-ru) that also mean something to the lines of "a person who has developed his own [fly] casting style".

I think I figured out how to make a very good splice and my last 4 nets have splices longer than 2 inches. The splice on the black and the one with rattan is very well made and invisible. I died one of them black, just slightly sanding it where the wood was most interesting. It's hard to get a picture of that one, but it looks very nice in person.
I'm also experimenting with new finishes, including some more traditional ones.
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Re: Net gallery

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2011 1:21 pm
by ToddW
These are the ones I've been working on this fall.

Most of these are green ash. I used water soluble dye and linseed oil, 6-8 coats, and 2 coats of spar varnish.

Re: Net gallery

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2011 2:28 pm
by Daniel @ Tenkara USA
WOW! Superb!
Beautiful nets, really well done. I really like the stain finish you achieved on those.

Re: Net gallery

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2011 3:56 pm
by ToddW
Thanks Daniel. Next to traipsing through the woods looking at branches, waking up the grain with that first application of stain is my favorite part of the process. I was really holding my breath on some of these; especially the ones I layered with two or three colors.

I feel I'm in a bit of a race with Mother Nature. The emerald ash borer(an Asian import, oddly enough) has been sited in Minnesota, and I suspect that over the next 5-10 years we'll lose all of our ash trees in the state. In my local area, these ash trees are the only type I can find that have the branches necessary for making a reasonable frame. I'm going to spend the next few years making as many frames as I can before the bug gets them.

I'm impressed with the character in your branches. You seem to be developing a signature style; in your travels and experience with tamos in Japan, have you noticed this with the various craftsmen who do this professionally?

Re: Net gallery

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2011 5:36 pm
by Daniel @ Tenkara USA
I think I have started noticing the different styles makers, and have noticed how my nets are taking their own style too. It's not very apparent, mostly because each branch already has its own characteristics, so it can be hard to detect, plus different makers will use different finishes and shaping for different branches.
The different in styles can be noticed on the shape of of the finished butt of the frame, some like to have more angular shapes, others rounder. On the finish some like to keep it clear, while others like to have a thicker paint covering the wood (or maybe they just do that with the more "boring" wood). Also, the rattan wraps are more apparent and distinguishable on on some than on others. I think there is a lot of room for style in the net making process, but I still have to learn much more about it.

Re: Net gallery

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2011 10:25 pm
by papa d
So what are you guys going to do with all those nets when done Are you going to sell a few?

Re: Net gallery

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2011 11:17 pm
by Daniel @ Tenkara USA
Right now I consider myself a student of the craft. I have learned tons by making them, and am still learning a bunch. I always refer back to nets I have made to see what I could be doing differently. I will probably end up selling one or another here and there, mostly to make space for new ones, but once I reach a certain point of confidence and am able to let go, I'll probably give some out.

Re: Net gallery

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2011 11:29 pm
by jayfisher
Daniel and Todd,

Your nets are really beautiful in the deepest sense of the word. Maybe one day when we look back at the early years when tenkara established its first foothold in the West, we'll see that the nets and the flies are part of a larger aesthetic that also gained a foothold. You're among the early pioneers in the West.

Here's a thought I've been wondering about:
There are hundreds of joints developed in Japan to join wood. Traditional Japanese joints used no nails or screws. There must be a traditional joint that's ideal for joining the tamo branches into a circle.

-Jack