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Invisible Silk Thread Wrap

A place to discuss tenkara nets. Techniques for making it, woods used, designs, etc.

Re: Invisible Silk Thread Wrap

Postby tnitz » Mon Sep 27, 2010 11:17 am

Was out of town. Chris correctly identifies the scarf ratio as 8:1 and most people use planes to achieve this gentle angle. Stephen's approach sounds really good.

I should clarify - I would agree that thread would add nothing to a steep scarf joint, but when you increase the angle to 8:1, you are talking a different beast altogether. However, if you have that scarf, there's no need for thread or other reenforcement so long as the glue line is good - the glued joint will be stronger than the lignin in the wood itself. Still, I will pin mine too.

Rattan would also look great and the nets I've seen that have used rattan have a great finished look to them.

In my case, the thread is intended to reenforce the "crotch" of the net, not the joint. The branch that called out to me is atypical in that the crotch area was actually three terminal branches coming out of one branch, not two (or more) side branches and a main stem cut off. I am confident in the strength of the wood there, but as it dries I may decide to reenforce that crotch with a thread wrapping. Since I have no intention of doing any more decorative work to it, I thought that rattan would call too much attention to itself, whereas the silk would disappear into the finish. I may not need it at all.

However, the thread would also come in handy where there was a scarf if, instead of sanding or carving the two spliced branches together to form the appearance of one single branch, you wanted to preserve as much wood as possible and thus the two branches were of difference diameters though solidly scarfed, you could wrap the section with thread simply to smooth out the difference and prevent "grooves" or "shelves" in the scarfed section. Here it does not add strength but serves as a method of preventing damage. I think that's why one person who repaired a net added rattan over the scarfs - it doesn't add any strength that I can see, but covers the scarf itself.
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Re: Invisible Silk Thread Wrap

Postby Stephen McGowen » Mon Sep 27, 2010 3:30 pm

Rattan is a substantial repair material...it isn't simply wrapped, it is glued in place. It is a material used in the earliest forms of composite construction...heck ...they make furniture out of just rattan and have been doing so for over a thousand years.
I have had good luck using it to re-enforce a tamo where you have one branch more flexible than the other. By removing material on the stiff side and wrapping rattan on the other , you can achieve a balanced flex which improves symmetry and strength and hopefully the life of the tamo. Makes some interesting design things possible too by doing wraps on the handle to augment the wraps on the hoop.

Troll the posted links to the Japanese tamo sights in the resources section. Some are obviously structural while others appear to be solely cosmetic.......just another design element in the Asian design vocabulary.
I'm told that just about all the rattan available to us today comes from Madegascar. Don't know for sure. Didn't the dodo bird once exist on Madegascar? Hmmmm.....wonder if there is a connection........
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Re: Invisible Silk Thread Wrap

Postby tnitz » Mon Sep 27, 2010 3:38 pm

I stand corrected. It was a stupid thing to say. What I actually meant to say was that in that example extra strength probably wasn't needed, but the rattan wrapping did add strength. Anyway, I've never used it so should keep my mouth shut!
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Re: Invisible Silk Thread Wrap

Postby Stephen McGowen » Mon Sep 27, 2010 3:47 pm

tnitz....don't be silly. I intended that you shouldn't overlook a useful material for tamo construction. It is like the old potato chip ad..."betcha can't make just one."
Check out the TenkaraUSA nets....if I'd found them back when I started making tamos...I'd stop making tamos! I received one today and promptly went and showed it to fishies in a pond just down the street. It worked well ..has good balance and strength. Looks good too....and all for 68 bucks....what a country.
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Re: Invisible Silk Thread Wrap

Postby tnitz » Tue Sep 28, 2010 9:27 am

I, for one, would like to know the construction details - I can't quite make out how it's pieced together from the photos. I suspect I will own one of the TenkaraUSA nets one of these days. What's holding me back is the same reason I didn't cut a second branch. I need to give all my attention to ensuring a good net from the branch I sacrificed first! But I do like the look of the new nets and will probably end up buying one of them, too.
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Re: Invisible Silk Thread Wrap

Postby Stephen McGowen » Tue Sep 28, 2010 10:29 am

tnitz...all you need to know is in links posted on this section. Check the resources section and some links that dwalker found. There is one japanese link that shows all the steps of cutting and joining the hoop. It is all here thanks to the efforts of forum members. Some are translated..... some not. "A picture is worth a thousand words" goes the old proverb.
Let me warn you again...after you finish your first tamo, it is really hard to stop....... post some pics when you are finished.
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Re: Invisible Silk Thread Wrap

Postby Daniel @ Tenkara USA » Tue Sep 28, 2010 10:04 pm

It's a learning process for all of us, I tried to detail what I did on one of the posts, but really it's piecing all the steps together and trying to figure out as I go from all those website resources.
Next year I hope to spend some time with a professional net maker and actually learn how to make them. But, meanwhile join us in the learning experience.
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Re: Invisible Silk Thread Wrap

Postby tnitz » Wed Sep 29, 2010 11:11 am

I will, I will! I have a beautiful frame drying and want more than anything to start in on it. But, as I said, it's still weeping. It's juniper and I know it's going to be a nice looking net - it told me so!

While on the subject, I have seen descriptions and drawings of scarfing blocks used for creating 8:1 scarf joints. I never got around to making any permanent ones, but have used temporary ones before. Essentially, you build a ramp to the 8:1 slope with a "groove" or slot in the middle where your wood to be scarfed sits. The ramps on either side of the worked wood limit the plane depth. I think it would work well for this, the only issue I can see is that most of us are drying/steaming the arms of the hoop to circular shape first, so we would have to gently straighten the limbs to sit in the scarfing jig.

I'm considering going this route - my reason is that my particular frame arms get fairly thin where they will join and I want to maximize the wood left. In other words I will be making a long scarf, making a gluing surface flat on the larger limb and removing more of the smaller limb until it gently tapers out. I don't think I have the skill to try this with a saw.
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Re: Invisible Silk Thread Wrap

Postby tnitz » Wed Sep 29, 2010 2:59 pm

I wasn't clear earlier - the construction details I am curious about (though perhaps none of my business) are those of the new TenkaraUSA tamo. I can't quite make out the scarfs on them and am just curious, is all.

I agree the links to construction details of the handmade tamo are great and well covered already. I've really enjoyed reviewing them over and over the past few weeks.
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