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West meets East tamo

A place to discuss tenkara nets. Techniques for making it, woods used, designs, etc.

West meets East tamo

Postby Stephen McGowen » Thu Jul 15, 2010 11:50 am

Latest tamo attempting to marry western and eastern ideas. Wood is American Holly collected from last fall's pruning. Elliptical hoop shaped on a waste basket form and Ghost net bag. Raffia wraps on the hoop and handle as I couldn't find small enough rattan locally....same family of plants so I used it. Had to twist the raffia as I wrapped it so it would have the visual effect of rattan and it provides the same enhanced grip surface. Required antler tip at the end of the handle.
Painted the hoop and handle top black as do many of the ayu tamo makers. Sets off the light wood nicely and hides some flaws in the hoop.
Pics aren't great but you get the idea.
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Re: West meets East tamo

Postby tnitz » Wed Aug 18, 2010 1:10 pm

I would be interested in learning of the significance of the black paint. Even if that meaning is lost today, I suspect it once had great meaning. Are there any that combine red and black?
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Re: West meets East tamo

Postby Daniel @ Tenkara USA » Wed Aug 18, 2010 5:55 pm

Not specifically about Stephen's net, which I can't speak for, but the black is just a type of lacquer normally used to reinforce areas of rods and nets (lacquer in this case is called "Urusu" in Japanese, and is the sap of tree which is heated and also very fireproof when done).
Example:
Image
And, yes, black and red are the two colors one can find, black being much more common.
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Re: West meets East tamo

Postby tnitz » Thu Aug 19, 2010 8:57 am

I wasn't trying to be secretive, just kinda rushed yesterday. The reason I asked is that on the NW Coast of North America, black and red are dominant colors and have specific meanings. They are most often used in pairs, with black representing the instinctual or physical side of our being, red representing the spiritual, parental, or caring side of our being. I've been told that no-one is pure red or black, but each of us have our strengths and thus you might be largely black with a little red, etc. Anyway, fishing gear is more of a black thing.

I don't pretend to be an expert on anything, and what I was told could very well be wrong, but was just curious if, in this most ancient practice of fishing, there was any correlation.

Also, many dipnets today, from the coast inland, use steel hoops and wood shafts so if someone is looking for ideas on construction, you might peruse examples of current native dipnets. Personally, I find the two traditions rather complimentary.
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Re: West meets East tamo

Postby Stephen McGowen » Thu Aug 19, 2010 11:53 am

Black and red are the two most popular and traditional colors in many cultures because they are the easiest pigments to obtain. Black is readily available from the ashes of your cooking fire and many fruits and berries and their juices are red so they can be easily found. Biologists say the color of the fruits attracts creatures that eat them and then spread the seeds around in their travels. A reproductive strategy on the part of the plants.

Of course colors have an emotional component and for many a mystical component as well. Consider what the National Socialists did, in an emotional context, in Germany with the colors of red and black and the Bolshevik Revolution and their embrace of the color red.

As for fishing tackle , I look at it this way.....black things are more stealthy in the shaded environment that trouts love. Red things are more easily found, if you put them down on the bank for a minute or so. That is the only significance I'm willing to entertain for the colors of fishing tackle....
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