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California Torreya and Manzanita.

PostPosted: Mon Jun 21, 2010 12:06 am
by Daniel @ Tenkara USA
Found some California Torreya today, relative of the Kaga. It looks good, but the trees I found were a bit too young.
Also, found a good branch from a manzanita tree today. I hope the wood may be good for a net, the manzanita doesn't offer a lot of ideal branches for a net at all, it was hard to find something and it's okay, not great. But, It's widely available and the coloration of the wood is beautiful.

Re: California Torreya and Manzanita.

PostPosted: Mon Jun 21, 2010 6:44 am
by Adam Trahan
You have a bunch of blind followers that are going to go out and start cutting down tree branches next to and around a stream. That is a very quick way to turn me against you.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torreya_californica

A quick search does not show that this is a protected species of tree but that is secondary to what I am concerned with.

Perhaps you should start out writing about taking downed trees for your new wood benders.

Re: California Torreya and Manzanita.

PostPosted: Mon Jun 21, 2010 8:48 am
by Daniel @ Tenkara USA
Yes, of course, I can only suggest people take downed trees/branches.

Re: California Torreya and Manzanita.

PostPosted: Mon Jun 21, 2010 10:41 am
by rsetina
I think we were just disrespected again. :lol: I just have to laugh at some of the things I read and just let it go.

Re: California Torreya and Manzanita.

PostPosted: Mon Jun 21, 2010 12:20 pm
by Adam Trahan
Thanks Daniel.

There will be a learning curve for making nets and I care about the stream and it's surrounding environment. People can defend themselves, trees can't and can die because of a split running and or an insult to the tree, insects, mold, etc. I don't want a tree to die because someone wants to save money and try to learn how to make a net that they don't like and blah blah blah

Maybe a lesson on how to cut the branch, selection, the learning curve of making a net you will carry.

That sort of thing.

Tough job making everyone happy.

Re: California Torreya and Manzanita.

PostPosted: Mon Jun 21, 2010 2:20 pm
by wrknapp
I don't think the trees are worrying about a few tenkara craftsmen. I like trees as much as the next guy (well maybe not as much as you, Adam) but I can think of countless ways trees are destroyed or hurt that make a careless tenkara fisher/craftsman seem like a saint. May I suggest planting a few to replace any harmed. Here in Virginia, you can get the trees free to plant. Knowing my own limitations, I will probably opt to purchase a net for myself should one become available.

Randy

Re: California Torreya and Manzanita.

PostPosted: Mon Jun 21, 2010 3:32 pm
by rsetina
When I think of the tree in my mom's back yard and all the times we cut the entire tree back until there were just the large branches coming from the main truck, according to Adams theory it should have died over a decade ago. It's the most shady tree I have ever seen. Trees grow more branches when pruned. It's a natural affect of loosing branches. This doesn't mean that I'm going to go out looking for branches in a tree for a tamo and bring home several. I'll look for downed trees first since it would be easier to procure one from the ground.

Re: California Torreya and Manzanita.

PostPosted: Mon Jun 21, 2010 4:08 pm
by Adam Trahan
Odd, no floatant, bad for the environment, tamo, check out the trees for a good net!

I wrote a story of a place I went fly fishing in Hawaii, a dangerous spot on a shelf 15' above the water that was very deep straight down. The water would come up without breaking in a wave, blue water surging up to the lip of the ledge 15' up and then pour over 2' thick on the slick rocks. I played with the jacks below with my 10 weight knowing I couldn't land them easily but it was fun.

A few months after the story, a woman called me and detailed her story. Her husband had been lost at sea, his fly rod found at the spot I had written about, it was found wedged in the rocks. They had found my story printed out in his suitcase at the hotel and tracked back to the spot. It was dangerous, being a surfer, I was having fun and wrote about it like everyone would have fun there.

I promised the woman that in the future, I would be careful about what I wrote.

Low impact in the wild, that's how I do it and I am so far from a tree hugger but as I get older, it isn't so bad to hug a tree.

Later.

Re: California Torreya and Manzanita.

PostPosted: Mon Jun 21, 2010 4:25 pm
by Daniel @ Tenkara USA
Just took a trip to the local botanical garden to get more familiar with the California Torreya and to confirm I had indeed found it yesterday. Yes, it was a torreya I found, but I'm not sure it's the best tree to use. It may have suitable branches, but definitely not a lot. The tree was huge and I may have seen one branch that would work well. On the other hand I saw a few other conifers that have more branches that seem suitable to the shape.
On further thought I do not think the manzanita will work well, there are no branches with the qualities needed.

I'm not advocating cutting trees, or damaging tree, and whenever possible, sure, I'll advise picking up a fallen branch (much easier on the tree and for the person). Yes, be responsible when selecting a branch and embarking on the craft.

I'll liken this to keeping the odd fish from a healthy stream that doesn't see many people. I release more than I keep, keep less than I need, and am responsible in my taking. It's a part of life, it keeps me connected to the stream and nature, it reminds me where my food comes from, and I'll tell you honestly, it hurts me and makes me sad when I kill a fish to eat, and I deeply respect every fish I catch. It's not a "toy" when you see it die, not as magazines make it look. I take the same philosophy to finding wood for a net. I'm not a logger, and would never work for a logging company, and I'll not cut a tree down to pick a branch, but some prunning won't hurt it, and I expect everyone who is interested in the craft, and inclined to study on how to make it, to have a similar level of respect. Plus, as someone just reminded me, the amount of work that takes to make a net is incredible, so, I would expect anyone who will want to do it will be very careful and selective with their branch selection and will not go on cutting tons of branches. I'll look forward to learning from those who take on the craft.

Re: California Torreya and Manzanita.

PostPosted: Mon Jun 21, 2010 4:35 pm
by Adam Trahan
I'll never be quiet about good ethics in the wild, ever.