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Can you leave the bark on?

A place to discuss tenkara nets. Techniques for making it, woods used, designs, etc.

Can you leave the bark on?

Postby Scott Anglin » Mon Dec 30, 2013 8:47 pm

I recently got into tenkara fishing and now I am starting to experiment with net building. I found a very good pine branch the other day, cut it, shaped it, and am now drying it. Not certain what kind of pine but the bark is very smooth, thin, and grayish looking. It is not ruff at all. My question, can I just go ahead and leave the bark on or should I definitely remove it? I actually like the way it looks with the bark on. Not certain if leaving the bark on will cause problems later? Any advice would be greatly appreciated
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Re: Can you leave the bark on?

Postby rsetina » Tue Dec 31, 2013 4:01 pm

It can't hurt to leave the bark on. If it eventually falls off you can refinish the wood underneath. Experiment with it and let us know how it turns out. I know of many woodworkers who like to leave natural edges on their pieces for a more decorative look.

I wonder if the bark begins to come off, if you'd be able to keep it attached using CA glue? (Super Glue)
I've use it on some of my pens and turned bowls to fill in cracks.
Rick

テンカラ。小さなストリームのシンプルさ。
My Tenkara Rods:
13' Ayu, 12' Yamame, 11' with a conversion handle, and an Ito.

My Wife's Tenkara Rods:
12' Ebisu and 13.5' Amago, 12' Iwana with a conversion handle, and an Ito.
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Re: Can you leave the bark on?

Postby Scott Anglin » Tue Dec 31, 2013 5:02 pm

Thanks for the advice.
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Re: Can you leave the bark on?

Postby tsegelke » Tue Dec 31, 2013 5:37 pm

My experience is that the bark is a natural barrier to protect the tree. It will make drying very slow. When the edge does start to crack, I would suggest putting a marine epoxy as a finish. Be sure to allow the resin to seep into the cracks, or that will be where the water starts to go to work on the net.

Leaving the bark on can be a wonderful look. It does take more time and effort to put a good seal on it though.
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Re: Can you leave the bark on?

Postby Scott Anglin » Tue Dec 31, 2013 6:34 pm

So what I am hearing is that leaving the bark on would be ok. Is that correct?

Also, how long should the drying process take? It should be dry (low humidity) for the next couple of months and then be moderate humidity when summer hits.
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Re: Can you leave the bark on?

Postby tsegelke » Tue Dec 31, 2013 7:36 pm

I would not try it, but for what I have heard it can be done.

The drying is for the form to take, and to reduce the amount of expansion and contraction the wood will naturally do in dryer and wetter times of year. I would keep it in an area that stays consistent and dry. I think that 3 months should work.

Keep us posted on your progress.
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Re: Can you leave the bark on?

Postby Scott Anglin » Tue Dec 31, 2013 8:36 pm

I am going to go ahead and just strip the bark. Seems like there will be less issues later.

When should I strip the bark? Now or later? I just cut and formed the branch two days ago.

I really appreciate your help.
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Re: Can you leave the bark on?

Postby dwalker » Tue Dec 31, 2013 10:16 pm

Scott Anglin wrote:When should I strip the bark? Now or later? I just cut and formed the branch two days ago.
.


I would do it right away.

Here are 3 examples from Japanese websites. No need to try to read the Japanese text. The important thing is to notice the dates. Tenkaraman cuts his branch on Nov 1st, then strips the bark off Nov 2nd. He uses a high pressure water spray. Not sure I would recommend it , but it worked for him.

Nov 1 cut branches, you'll see later why he cut two.
http://tenkaraman.seesaa.net/article/379056430.html
Nov 2 peel off the bark.
http://tenkaraman.seesaa.net/article/379147973.html
Nov 4th, drying on the round form. Notice he does something unusual, he cuts off the handle to fit one with an angle he likes better. At least that is what he seems to be doing.
http://tenkaraman.seesaa.net/article/381787131.html
Dec 11th, cutting and gluing the hoop,
http://tenkaraman.seesaa.net/article/382373795.html

An older post from another site, a different approach. Peeling off the bark and needles with a knife or saw blade.
http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/urotasoniko/33771622.html

Another example of pealing off the bark sooner rather than later.
http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/urotasoniko/18430979.html

If you're interested, you can find a bunch of Japanese web sites showing various ways they make Tamos by doing a google search with the following Japanese phrase. Lots of different approaches or ideas. A picture is worth a thousand words, and I can hear the words in English, right? :roll:

渓流タモ の木 タモ作り

That translates, more or less literally, as Mountain Stream Tamo of Wood Tamo Making. Or - Making a wooden mountain stream tamo.

HNY, ;)
D
Tenkara is fundamental fishing fun
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Re: Can you leave the bark on?

Postby scorpion1971 » Wed Jan 01, 2014 12:44 pm

With the links dwalker posted from Nov 2 and Nov 4, he is not using the same piece. The one used on Nov 4 is from a branch that was drying for a year. It takes a long time for the branches to dry and it is best to give them a year.
Mike P.
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Re: Can you leave the bark on?

Postby dwalker » Wed Jan 01, 2014 4:12 pm

scorpion1971 wrote:With the links dwalker posted from Nov 2 and Nov 4, he is not using the same piece. The one used on Nov 4 is from a branch that was drying for a year. It takes a long time for the branches to dry and it is best to give them a year.

Mike, you are quite right. The Nov 4th link is a different branch. In trying to show further steps in the frame making process I made it confusing. I am aware that in general it is recommended to let the frame dry for a year before finishing the frame. Though I think most people are to impatient to wait that long.

However, the important point is that the Nov 1st post showing the harvesting of the branch states that the next day he will do the pealing work. And I believe the branch being pealed with the high pressure water on Nov 2nd is the same Kaya tree branch cut the previous day. I believe it is common practice to remove the bark before setting the branch aside to dry for several months.

The Nov 3d post, I think, clearly shows the same recently harvested branch, stripped of bark and being attached to a metal hoop to dry.

http://tenkaraman.seesaa.net/category/21226076-3.html

Sorry for any confusion. :oops:

D
Tenkara is fundamental fishing fun
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