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Wading options for backpacking

What are the other ESSENTIAL pieces of equipment you carry with you? How do you pack? How do you hold your gear while fishing? Fly boxes? Snips? you tell us.

Wading options for backpacking

Postby JDP1292 » Sun Nov 13, 2011 2:28 am

As my other thread stated I'm starting to compile a backpacking kit for short, 2-3 day backpacking trips. My biggest question is what do you do for wading? Currently I use a pair of hip waders, but as far as I can tell any wader options take up a large amount of room and don't really fit into a pack at all. I'm thinking just wet wading and staying on the bank as possible? What is your alls opinion?
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Re: Wading options for backpacking

Postby tntom » Sun Nov 13, 2011 7:25 pm

I don't know where you fish but in the Smokeys park where I fish the fish are very spooky the less your in the water the better. I say fish a longer rod and stay out of the water and carry less weight.

Tom
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Re: Wading options for backpacking

Postby statikpunk » Sun Nov 13, 2011 8:52 pm

if the water is not to darn cold and Im keeping to the shallow water then i actually preffer to wet wade. I do take a light pair of water shoes though. nothing sucks more than hiking in wet shoes :o
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Re: Wading options for backpacking

Postby bpfrocket » Mon Nov 14, 2011 7:04 am

Frogg Toggs makes some stockingfoot hip waders that pack very small. They are NOT light though. No heavier than any other hip style, but they do have the neoprene foot section. They also run a bit small. Order a size larger than you think you need, then be prepared for it to be tight. I am also going to look at some of the Chota hip waders that are mentioned somewhere on the forums here.
You'd be surprised how hot waders can be even in cool weather, and how fast you can warm up from wet wading.

Good luck,
Bruce
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Re: Wading options for backpacking

Postby Paul Arnold » Mon Nov 14, 2011 7:20 am

On the Frogg Togg Web site, they say (admit?) that the foot size of their XL size breathable wading products is 9.5 to 11. It appears that the larger-size waders have feet no larger than the XL.

That is a disappointment to me; my shoe size is 13 street/14 wading, and I had planned to replace my Simms waders -- when they shoot craps -- with a pair of Frogg Togg Hellbender waders. It looks like that ain't to be.
Last edited by Paul Arnold on Mon Nov 14, 2011 11:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Wading options for backpacking

Postby TJ @ Tenkara USA » Mon Nov 14, 2011 11:14 am

The Chota Hippies I just purchased and used last week are nice. They don't seem heavy to me and are hip waders. Just enough to keep dry in not too deep of water. tj
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Re: Wading options for backpacking

Postby rmcworthing » Tue Nov 15, 2011 6:03 pm

JDP1292 wrote:As my other thread stated I'm starting to compile a backpacking kit for short, 2-3 day backpacking trips. My biggest question is what do you do for wading?


Water in the backcountry here in Utah is often cold enough to preclude wet wading.

I am just beginning work with a manufacturer on designing a pair of waders specifically for backpacking. Functional efficiency will be the driving principle - simple, light, multipurpose. I should preface this by saying I am an ultralight guy. So while I intend them to last, a bit of durability and comfort (ie. breathability) will have to be sacrificed to meet the goal.

Don't hold your breath, but I'll be sure to post once we have a prototype.

In the meantime, if anyone wants to share input on what they would like to see in a pair of waders specifically for backpacking, post up.
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Re: Wading options for backpacking

Postby statikpunk » Tue Nov 15, 2011 6:41 pm

rmcworthing wrote:
JDP1292 wrote:As my other thread stated I'm starting to compile a backpacking kit for short, 2-3 day backpacking trips. My biggest question is what do you do for wading?


Water in the backcountry here in Utah is often cold enough to preclude wet wading.

I am just beginning work with a manufacturer on designing a pair of waders specifically for backpacking. Functional efficiency will be the driving principle - simple, light, multipurpose. I should preface this by saying I am an ultralight guy. So while I intend them to last, a bit of durability and comfort (ie. breathability) will have to be sacrificed to meet the goal.

Don't hold your breath, but I'll be sure to post once we have a prototype.

In the meantime, if anyone wants to share input on what they would like to see in a pair of waders specifically for backpacking, post up.



a neoprene booty with a sole on it so you dont have to carry an extra pair of wading boots.
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Re: Wading options for backpacking

Postby Softouch333 » Sat Nov 19, 2011 8:50 am

Here is a previous thread addressing this topic:
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=660

I still have not found a better backpacking solution the Neos River Trekkers:
Good
1. No boot to carry or need to cache your hiking boot. Just pull the Trekkers on over your hiking shoe.
2, Very sturdy material allows you to crash through brush if needed and allows you to use them as rain coverage in camp.
3. Good studded traction makes climbing and walking easy without mud or snow pickup.
4. Quick on.
5. Room to stuff a rain jacket in the hipper top and a good place to put a rod handle temporarily when releasing fish or rigging.
Bad
1. A little more weight than I'd like.
2. Non breathable but with wide top not bad; do sweat a little on pant and boot if all day fishing.
3. Limited to just over knee deep water.
4. A little baggy causing a walking "swish" and a moderate amount of water pressure.

Still looking though...

Kevin
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Re: Wading options for backpacking

Postby masjc1 » Sun Nov 20, 2011 5:55 pm

I've been using the Neos for the past 3 three summers. So, they must be doing something right. To add to Kevin's comments the rubber soles can be a bit slick. This is especially true in the fall after the rocks have had time to accumulate a layer of slime. A more grippy sole would be a great addition.
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