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Dry fly rod - advice needed

Dry fly rod - advice needed

Postby -chs- » Thu Apr 18, 2013 7:44 am

Hi all,

I bought an amago this winter and want to buy a second rod for fishing dry flies on rivers and creeks in the west. Some of the rivers I fish are the Missouri, Henry's Fork, Silver Creek,Owyhee and the Big Horn. I will be casting 16-22 mayfly patterns and I am looking for some advice.

Which rod do you recommend for 3 hours of casting to feeding fish on these types of rivers?

Thank you in advance
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Re: Dry fly rod - advice needed

Postby erik.ostrander » Thu Apr 18, 2013 3:52 pm

Those are big rivers, and you may hook into a big fish. Any tenkara rod will cast dry flies magically, but you need a rod that can handle a bigger fish.

I recommend the Ayu II because it has decent backbone and good length.
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Re: Dry fly rod - advice needed

Postby -chs- » Thu Apr 18, 2013 6:42 pm

erik.ostrander wrote:Those are big rivers, and you may hook into a big fish. Any tenkara rod will cast dry flies magically, but you need a rod that can handle a bigger fish.

I recommend the Ayu II because it has decent backbone and good length.



Thanks, I found trying to cast dries with the Amago is cumbersome and tiring. I am looking for the Winston 9" #4 of tenkara rods. The kind of rod where I know I will be fishing to a hatch all morning or evening and not nymphing or prospecting with big stoneflies or hoppers, the kind of rod that I can cast all day and still land a 16-17 inch fish.

Edit: please move to the rods section if needed, I meant to post this there.
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Re: Dry fly rod - advice needed

Postby bpfrocket » Fri Apr 19, 2013 4:16 am

-chs-
I haven't fished those waters, but here's my 2 cents worth.
You're right, the Amago isn't the rod for turning small flies. I use mine for big, large hook flies or even beadheads and western style streamers for larger warm-water fish like bass and crappie. It is a tiring rod for long days of many casts, but a very good nd capable rod. I even use mine from a kayak on lakes. For small flies like that a thinner profile rod like the Iwana or Ebisu would cast better, and with less fatigue. I don't know how big a fish you could take on one of those "safely" but I'm sure someone who has done so will answer here eventually. The rod that has become my "go to" rod for most situations has become the Ito. It can cast delicately and precisely, but also cast some pretty good sized flies. I cannot attest to its ability to handle big fish, but quite a few people here have done so, including Daniel in one of his videos.
You own the "Clydesdale" heavy workhorse with the Amago, now you just need a "quarterhorse" nimble workhorse to pair it with. You can fish your whole life with just one all-around rod, but I own 7 rods so far, love them all, and use them all. I always carry at least two when I fish, but never more than three or you start switching rods instead of switching flies.

Good luck,
Bruce
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Re: Dry fly rod - advice needed

Postby achilles38 » Fri Apr 19, 2013 10:24 pm

Honestly, I've used my Amago for over a year to cast dry flies and haven't had a problem. It is much better suited to casting weighted nymphs, multiple fly rigs, or heavy flies, but it has worked just fine for dry flies, even smaller ones. I've used size 18 griffin gnat and caught tons of fish. My 11' Iwana is much better at small dry fly casting, but I like the Amago. Granted, the Iwana is incredible at casting a fly, almost no effort to lay out a dry fly, I still use my Amago if I think the fish are going to be big. But the Iwana can handle pretty big fish, I've had 18" trout on it without a problem. You can cast the Iwana for hours and never get tired, the Amago takes a little getting used to and gets tired if you don't use it correctly, but once you get the hang of it you can cast it all day, especially with small dry flies. I've used it for 8-10 hours straight casting Ishigaki Kebari and other lighter dry flies and never had a problem, once I figured out to cast it correctly without tiring my arm out.
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Re: Dry fly rod - advice needed

Postby -chs- » Sat Apr 20, 2013 11:36 am

achilles38 wrote:Honestly, I've used my Amago for over a year to cast dry flies and haven't had a problem. It is much better suited to casting weighted nymphs, multiple fly rigs, or heavy flies, but it has worked just fine for dry flies, even smaller ones. I've used size 18 griffin gnat and caught tons of fish. My 11' Iwana is much better at small dry fly casting, but I like the Amago. Granted, the Iwana is incredible at casting a fly, almost no effort to lay out a dry fly, I still use my Amago if I think the fish are going to be big. But the Iwana can handle pretty big fish, I've had 18" trout on it without a problem. You can cast the Iwana for hours and never get tired, the Amago takes a little getting used to and gets tired if you don't use it correctly, but once you get the hang of it you can cast it all day, especially with small dry flies. I've used it for 8-10 hours straight casting Ishigaki Kebari and other lighter dry flies and never had a problem, once I figured out to cast it correctly without tiring my arm out.


Thanks everyone for the advice.
Please share the correct way to cast the Amago all day with dry flies.
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Re: Dry fly rod - advice needed

Postby houghland1966 » Sat Apr 20, 2013 11:23 pm

I started off my Tenkara with an Iwana which is a fantastic rod. I then moved to a longer heavier rod Identical in length and weight to the Amago ( I won't mention the name here ). At first I didn't like the rod as my arm grew tired very quickly, it took me a while to realise but I was trying to cast the rod like an Iwana. With the Iwana you can get away with extending your elbow to gain a little extra distance however with a longer rod there's too much leverage something to do with Newtons law I think. If you keep the rod close to your body and don't over extend your elbow the rod will feel light as a feather. Watch the vids on the forum. Also try and watch the late Mel Krieger become a puller not a pusher.
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Re: Dry fly rod - advice needed

Postby achilles38 » Sun Apr 21, 2013 8:03 am

Houghland had the same experience I had, except in reverse. I started with the Amago, figured it out eventually, then got an Iwana and way overpowered my casts and realized the light Iwana casts with very little movement. The Amago takes a little more movement and it does help to keep your arm close to your side. My arm, wrist, and especially finger used to get exhausted fairly quickly, and were even sore the day after I first used it. Keep elbow close, let the rod to the casting, and don't try to push the rod. The Amago feels top heavy to me so I let the top carry it to load and cast. Check out this video from TUSA on their youtube page. It shows John G. casting an Amago and talks about the proper technique and then go out and practice on your lawn. I have a knothead trout game I bought from adventureR that my wife and I practice with, or into our pool. Practice at home is what cleaned up my streamside casting. Set up targets and make it fun. My kids play also.

Here's the youtube link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yizquANxbw8

good luck,
Jeremy
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Re: Dry fly rod - advice needed

Postby Daniel @ Tenkara USA » Mon Apr 22, 2013 5:13 pm

Either the 12ft Iwana or the Ito will be fine. The Ito is a bit more expensive, but the length is going to come in very handy.
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