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Giving a trout a "time-out"

PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2012 9:11 pm
by TJ @ Tenkara USA
Before my local season ends, I have been hitting my creek every day for the last few days catching my halloween trout. There are 3 spots I hit each time that offer me nice easy access to the creek with fairly decent casting area around me, therefore the limited hour I have does not need to be waisted suiting up and wading and all that.

I hit all 3 spots, then go back again in cycle, 2 or 3 times, then call it an hour and head home.

My first spot gave me a nice quick take of my fly after a few casts but the rainbow only partially committed and I missed the strike or it just body slapped my kebari. After working the same spot for a bit, seemed the trout was on to me, so no more action.

So I gave the trout what I call a time-out. I snuck off, sat for 10 minutes with no activity on the creek, then snuck back to the same area on the creek and made a few casts to the same spot the trout body slapped my kebari before.

Seems like that brief time-out gave the trout a renewed need to strike at something bouncing off the water in front of it. I used the same exact technique, and this time had success. Caught the little guy and sent him back to play another day.

So next time you hit a creek and maybe showed signs of life under the water but did not catch a fish, sneak away, give the fish a little time-out, then come on back and give it another whirl.

Amazing what 10 minutes can do for you and the fish and if you don't succeed the 1st time, try try again until you do. Your technique of being patient will bring gooding tidings of joy.

TJ

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Re: Giving a trout a "time-out"

PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 2:34 am
by Hawk
I do the same thing, especially when it was a big trout.
My experience is that it takes at least half an hour or better an hour for the fish to calm down.

When it was a really good fish i tried this 3 or even 4 times over a day and usually the trout bites every time (and often still managed to not get hooked :lol: )

Re: Giving a trout a "time-out"

PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 9:19 am
by TJ @ Tenkara USA
Hawk wrote:I do the same thing, especially when it was a big trout.
My experience is that it takes at least half an hour or better an hour for the fish to calm down.

When it was a really good fish i tried this 3 or even 4 times over a day and usually the trout bites every time (and often still managed to not get hooked :lol: )


I know what you mean.

Some days I have to think, "Am I fishing for trout or is the trout fishing for me?" :lol:

Me thinks there are some college studied PHD trout in my waters that see another sucker they can play with all day. :twisted:

tj

Re: Giving a trout a "time-out"

PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 10:20 am
by williamhj
I remember hearing that what is really gained when we stop to switch flies is that the fish is gets a break and is more likely to strike when our new fly drifts past them.

Re: Giving a trout a "time-out"

PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 3:15 pm
by troutrageous1
I have a friend (spin fisherman, not fly fisherman) who swears by tossing a rock in a pool or slower moving water to watch the trout scatter and see where they were holding, wait about 10 minutes, and then start fishing. Rarely complains about a slow bite. I've never done it, but always thought it was an interesting way of "reading the water"...

Re: Giving a trout a "time-out"

PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 3:52 pm
by TJ @ Tenkara USA
The large Oak Balls were doing that for me.

They were falling out of the big oak trees above the creek and getting fish scared left and right.

Problem was they were scaring me also since they are the size of baseballs and I was almost pegged a few times.

When I first made my way to the creek I thought the fish were really going nuts and from the sounds of the kerplunks, they were humongous!

But then I saw they were the oak balls falling in the creek. :)

Tj

troutrageous1 wrote:I have a friend (spin fisherman, not fly fisherman) who swears by tossing a rock in a pool or slower moving water to watch the trout scatter and see where they were holding, wait about 10 minutes, and then start fishing. Rarely complains about a slow bite. I've never done it, but always thought it was an interesting way of "reading the water"...