Sign In | Sign Up to Shop/Forum

More fuel for the "one fly" fire

More fuel for the "one fly" fire

Postby albertyi » Thu Jan 12, 2012 4:24 pm

I was reading a past interview with Lance Egan.

http://troutlegend.com/player/behind-the-leader-board-lance-egan/

One of the questions was:
Hamann: Speaking of flies. As an accomplished fly designer for Umpqua Feather Merchants do you spend a lot of time these days developing new patterns for competition or have you settled on a few trusted ones? In the scope of effort and technique how much weight do you give to the “fly” as factor for winning competitions?

To which Lance answered:
Egan: On a scale of 1 – 10, 10 being totally the reason for winning and 1 being no factor at all I’d give the fly a 4. Proper technique and approach far outweigh the fly.

So there you have it. Straight from a team member of World Fly Fishing Championship Team USA.

- Albert
User avatar
albertyi
 
Posts: 135
Joined: Thu Apr 28, 2011 1:43 pm

Re: More fuel for the "one fly" fire

Postby Adam Trahan » Sun Feb 04, 2018 7:53 pm

Hi Albert, I am not surprised.

I've always said,
I would rather have the wrong fly in the right place than the right fly in the wrong place.
Adam Trahan
 
Posts: 285
Joined: Sat Aug 15, 2009 8:42 pm
Location: Phoenix, AZ - USA

Re: More fuel for the "one fly" fire

Postby Karl Klavon » Tue May 15, 2018 11:00 am

For a period of years now, pretty consistently but not 100% by any means, I have fished a pattern until it caught 10 fish, then changed to a different pattern and followed the same procedure over and over again for the total number of hours that I fished, on both lakes and streams. And for sure sometimes some patterns did pull fish from farther away and caught their 10-fish limits faster than other patterns did, but I have never found a time when any of the fly patterns I have used was a total and complete failure.

Some of these patterns are somewhat realistic insect based fly patterns, i.e. ants, beetles, hoppers, spiders, water-boatmen/back-swimmers, damselfly nymphs, scuds and midge pupa - fished when the fish are taking terrestrials at the surface of streams and lakes, or when midge pupae and damselflies are emerging from lakes, or scuds were present. But I also fish a number of patterns, i.e. the Herl Things, Slinkys, Sheeps Creek fly patterns to match different water color and lighting color conditions with my Butt Series of dry fly patterns. These are fly patterns that look like nothing in nature and have about 30% of their surface area made up of Fluorescent Hot Spots for the fish to target. Hint here for the best success with the "one fly guies" make the body of the fly any color you like, just as long as it turns out to be a BLACK body!

For me, speaking only of a purely personal preference, fishing and tying only a single fly pattern would be a very boring exercise and experience compared to tying and fishing with many different sizes and designs of fly patterns. You, on the other hand, may have something you wish to prove with the "one fly" thing, which I completely understand and wish you well on, so everyone is free to do as he or she pleases. It is your fishing so enjoy it any way you like and want to practice it in our sport. You may want to give the 10/change/10/change concept a try as well, it's just another way of proving the "one fly concept" by coming at it from the opposite direction. But both approaches will conclusively demonstrate that fly pattern choice is not nearly as important as the emphasis most fly anglers place on it in the total scheme of things....Karl.
Karl Klavon
 
Posts: 644
Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2011 10:01 am

Re: More fuel for the "one fly" fire

Postby Adam Trahan » Fri May 18, 2018 12:08 am

For me, speaking only of a purely personal preference, fishing and tying only a single fly pattern would be a very boring exercise and experience compared to tying and fishing with many different sizes and designs of fly patterns. You, on the other hand, may have something you wish to prove with the "one fly" thing, which I completely understand and wish you well on, so everyone is free to do as he or she pleases. It is your fishing so enjoy it any way you like and want to practice it in our sport. You may want to give the 10/change/10/change concept a try as well, it's just another way of proving the "one fly concept" by coming at it from the opposite direction. But both approaches will conclusively demonstrate that fly pattern choice is not nearly as important as the emphasis most fly anglers place on it in the total scheme of things....Karl.


Hi Karl, I did fly fishing for a long time in streams, rivers, lakes and the ocean, I studied the likes of LaFontain, Borger, Rosborough and a lot others. Split cane while thinking about the different colors of caddis I troubled over, which color to tye, to try. Everything in my fly fishing pointed to way to much thinking, too much everything, everything was killing it for me. ...and then I was sharing, promoting it all online, reading the arguments, all the people saying this and that about fly fishing.

Timing was everything for me, anyway, I got my tenkara rod form Daniel early on and my fishing took off again. I was having fun again, more fun, with less. For me, less is more, not more, less.

Everything in my life, I learn from, it's all my choice. I do things my way, I choose the things I do to learn what I want. I typically share what I learn and enjoy the process of sharing.

But one fly?

It's a technique and it's broad spectrum.

Beginner to expert, it teaches many things.

I understand it.

Some will, others won't, it really doesn't matter to me but it's as close to magic in fishing as I can explain.

I've outfitted many accomplished long term veteran fly fishers using one pattern. I'm not into catching more fish than anyone else any longer though, I've only learned that in the last few years. I learned that through tenkara as well.

There are a couple of tenkara experts that I have meet that use minimal patterns or one fly. They seem pretty happy doing it for years, I do it and then fish some friends flys then fish my own and my "wrong fly" and to be honest, I'm down to about three patterns that I use, my one fly being what I use most.

I'm no longer just a one fly guy, I go back to it now and then but I'm no longer strict about it.

It's a great learning technique but more importantly, it's a great way to keep that one fly in the water all the time rather than pondering on which fly to fish. It does many things.

Just some thoughts.

Hope you catch lots of fish this year, thanks for your reply.
Adam Trahan
 
Posts: 285
Joined: Sat Aug 15, 2009 8:42 pm
Location: Phoenix, AZ - USA

Re: More fuel for the "one fly" fire

Postby Karl Klavon » Sat May 19, 2018 12:03 pm

A More Productive Path: Thank you Adam for contributing your random thoughts on the “one fly fire” concept. Early on most anglers simply want to catch fish and go about it in a mostly arbitrary way, most looking for that Magic Fly pattern that will always guarantee good catches – which doesn’t really exist. And many anglers never graduate beyond that point. A more productive method is to go about it in a purposeful way, by learning as much as you can learn about the fish and the environments they have to live in: the water.

Water Color, Light, And Vision: For instance, water comes in a multitude of shades of 3 basic colors: Blue (for gin clear water), Green (for algae stained water) and Red-Brown (for turbid, tea colored to coffee brown – with and without cream added) colored waters. Neither we, nor the fish can see light directly, but only as it is reflected back into our eyes from an object that reflects the same wave-length of light that is illuminating the object we see – all the other colors of the light spectrum are being absorbed by that object we see as red. Black and white are not considered to be colors at all as white light is made up of all of the colors of the visible light spectrum, and black absorbs all the colors of the light spectrum that strike it. The color grey, (which is a mixture of Black and White) remains more or less gray in any color of light.

The Importance Of Contrast And Motion To Fish: So, what does all this business about colors and light have to do with fish and catching them? Fish have a number of ways of finding their food: They can feel and hear it through their lateral lines, barbules if so equipped, and ears, they can smell and taste food in the water through their nostrils, but in the final run food has to be seen in order to be swallowed by predatory fish. And what counts the most in visibility for fish is contrast and motion. Contrast with the watercolor and/or the fishing background the fish view the fly against. Unlike people, fish do not have any particular color preferences, other than the fact that easy to see flies and motion excite them into striking at flies, as long as the colors and contrast are not too bright. Think - Light on Dark in fly patterns, and Dark on Light or the opposite on backgrounds.

Fish, Water Temperature, And Pattern Brightness: Fish are cold-blooded animals, meaning that their bodies are the same temperature as the water in which they are swimming. In really cold water, the fish need a bigger and brighter enticement to move them to seek food. As the water reaches the optimum temperature range, the food imitation can be smaller and duller in color and the fish will readily take it as they feel good and are quite active in those water temperature ranges. But if the water temperature goes into the warm to hot range, the smallest and dullest (possibly all black) lures will be needed to get the desired results.

Fluorescent Colors And Pattern Visibility: Fluorescent colors glow or light-up in Ultraviolet Light, which is invisible to people, but not to birds, fish and insects. Plain red is the first color to fade out. This is usually shown in depth charts which go on down to well below the depths where tenkara anglers typically fish, but it applies to sideways distances in the water just as well as it does to depth distances. FL-colors need to be illuminated by a color of a shorter wave-length to fluoresce, but will keep their color well beyond the distance where plain colors turn gray and then fade out to black.

Why 16 Shades of FL- Glo-Brite Floss? Glo-Brite Floss makes 16 different shades of Flourscent Floss, which can more or less be broken down into the red/orange, yellow/green and blue color groups.

G-B Red Range Floss Purposes: The reds are made up of: #1 – Neon Magenta, #2 – Glo-Brite Pink, #3 – Glo-Brite Crimson, and #4 – Glo-Brite Scarlet, which are recommended for dawn, dusk, and dull days conditions.

G-B Orange Range Floss Purposes: The oranges include: #5 – Fire Orange, #6 – Glo-Brite Hot Orange, #7 – Glo-Brite Orange, #8 Glo-Brite Amber and #9 – Glo-Brite Chrome Yellow (which turns green under Black Light), all of which are recommended for bright days.

G-B Yellow Range Floss Purposes: The yellows are a little confusing as Chrome Yellow is placed in with the oranges by G-B, and #10 – Glo-Brite Yellow is listed as a yellow along with #11 - Phosphor Yellow - all of which turn green under a Black Light, (which is actually more of a chartreuse color) and they are all are recommended to be used in colored waters.

G-B Green Floss Range Purposes: The Greens are made up of: #12 – Glo-Brite Lime Green, and #13 – Glo-Brite Green, which are recommended to be used during dull lighting conditions.

G-B Blue Floss Range Purposes: The Blues are composed of: #14 –Glo-Brite Blue, #15 Glo-Brite Purple, and #16 – Glo-Brite White, (which under Black Light is a brighter blue than the G-B Blue floss is). The blues are recommended for clear waters in all conditions.

What this color selection does is give you a bright, a medium, and a dull FL-color shade of floss to use in all the different conditions needed to align with all of the different water temperature, and lighting condition requirements needed.

The Blue Water HiVis Colors Are: In shallow Blue Waters, the colors most visible to fish will be: FL-orange, FL-blue, FL-pink, FL-yellow, FL-green and FL-chartreuse, and Glow-White - as well as gold and silver wire and/or tinsel.

The Green Water HiVis Colors Are: In Green Waters the colors most visible to fish will be: FL-orange, FL-red, FL-pink and Glow-White, as well as silver and gold wire and/or tinsel.

The Brown-Red Water HiVis Colors Are: In Turbid Waters the most effective colors will be: FL-Chartreuse, gold and black, with the oranges, reds, and pinks becoming too bright and putting the fish off in this water color situation.

Low Light HiVis Colors: In Low Light Conditions the fish are running on their Rod Cell vision only, so no colors are visible to them. Here, Glow White, FL-white, silver, black and shades of gray are all that are required for the fish to see your patterns - Here color is a lost cause and has no place in low light fishing.

Black Is In A Class All By Itself: Black is a special case in that it is the most visible to fish color in all the different water color conditions, even on a moonless night and when fishing in the muddiest of off color waters, so the fact that all the other colors fade into black sooner or later with distance is not necessarily a bad thing.

Conclusion: The “one fly fire concept" is an attempt to simplify angling for the sake of simplicity itself in a very complex environment that the fish have no choice but to live and hunt for their food in, which probably involves a lot of factors mentioned above that most anglers do not know about and have never given any thought to. I believe the “one fly concept” (while admittedly highly successful) is an oversimplification that ignores many highly significant and important angling facts and factors. However, please feel free to fish in the way that it pleases you the most! Someone once said, Ignorance is Bliss, and that may be equally true in this situation as well….Karl.
Last edited by Karl Klavon on Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:45 am, edited 2 times in total.
Karl Klavon
 
Posts: 644
Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2011 10:01 am

Re: More fuel for the "one fly" fire

Postby Karl Klavon » Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:30 am

Please take a look at this by someone who is reconsidering the "one fly" fire concept: http://tetontenkara.blogspot.com/2018/06/home-waters.html
Karl Klavon
 
Posts: 644
Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2011 10:01 am


Return to General technique

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests