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The film RiverWebs and related ecology groups

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The film RiverWebs and related ecology groups

Postby dwalker » Sat Jan 08, 2011 10:28 pm

By chance I found a video today that is a trailer for a film titled “ River Webs”. This may be old news to many but it was new to me.

It is a film about stream ecology and is based upon the work or other inspired work began by Japanese ecologists Dr. Shigeru Nakano. The trailer hints that something happened to him and indeed a quick google search revealed that he lost his life in the Sea of Cortez in March 2000.

The trailer shows some of the things that effect life in the stream and the chain reaction of how those changes affect the feeding of other creatures along the stream. Including how fish change their feeding habits during the presence or absence of drifting insects and how two species will either compete for the same food or switch to different sources of food and also the effects from introduction of non-native species such as the Rainbow trout.

In the process of viewing this film I also learned a new word. Benethic or Benthos – the flora and fauna found in the sediment of the stream bead. And learned of the existence of NABS , the N.A. Benethological Society.

The youtube videos from RiverWebs were posted two years ago. But the videos are less than 4 minutes long and worth a look , I think. There are 4 videos posted by youtube user TheBlueMayFly. You can even spot a tenkara pole in one or two of them.

RiverWebs Trailer
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fs1AZrhh ... re=channel

Educational Sequences from RiverWebs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hETqaIpe ... er&list=UL

About NABS - this one was posted Sept 2010
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dChyTqgP ... re=channel

Learn More at the following links:

http://www.riverwebs.org/index.html

https://www.benthos.org/
https://www.benthos.org/Education-and-Outreach.aspx

http://freshwatersillustrated.org/

http://warnercnr.colostate.edu/~kurtf/n ... ibute.html


Hope you found this useful.
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Re: The film RiverWebs and related ecology groups

Postby Owl Jones » Sat Jan 08, 2011 10:38 pm

That's very interesting. Thank you for taking the time to post those links for us!
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Re: The film RiverWebs and related ecology groups

Postby Daniel @ Tenkara USA » Sun Jan 09, 2011 12:57 am

This is a wonderful movie, and I've watched it it a couple of times. I did a blog post on it back in April: http://www.tenkarausa.com/blog/?p=726. The most interesting find to me is how the introduction of rainbow trouts in waters they are not native to, has the same impact as covering the stream and preventing bugs from coming to the stream since rainbows are such good predators that they usually get the food first.

It's said that Dr. Nakano used for catching fish he was observing during some of his studies. He'd dive, spot fish, and with a tenkara rod above the water he'd cast to the fish he was observing and studied their behavior. There is a stream ecologist student in Oregon whom we supported with some gear and is conducting similar studies, also using tenkara.I'd imagine that would be very hard to do with a reel.
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Re: The film RiverWebs and related ecology groups

Postby Owl Jones » Sun Jan 09, 2011 4:05 am

"The most interesting find to me is how the introduction of rainbow trouts in waters they are not native to, has the same impact as covering the stream and preventing bugs from coming to the stream since rainbows are such good predators that they usually get the food first."

I'm sorry Daniel. I didn't quite follow that...do you mean that it's the same for the native fish? In other words, the rainbow trout out-compete the natives for the available food? I think our brook trout populations here were pushed into the headwaters by erosion and habitat destruction AND the introduction of brown and rainbow trout who found our rivers to be just fine by them and soon multiplied and took over whole rivers...

I think I understand you, but just wanted to be sure.
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Re: The film RiverWebs and related ecology groups

Postby dwalker » Sun Jan 09, 2011 12:56 pm

Daniel @ TenkaraUSA wrote:This is a wonderful movie, and I've watched it it a couple of times. I did a blog post on it back in Apri


Ahhh. A bit of old news then. While I do not recall watching the video you posted in April, I do remember the picture of the two guys in the water. So I must have seen the original blog posting.
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Re: The film RiverWebs and related ecology groups

Postby dwalker » Sun Jan 09, 2011 1:38 pm

Owl Jones wrote:"The most interesting find to me is how the introduction of rainbow trouts in waters they are not native to, has the same impact as covering the stream and preventing bugs from coming to the stream since rainbows are such good predators that they usually get the food first."

I'm sorry Daniel. I didn't quite follow that...do you mean that it's the same for the native fish? .


OJ - I don't think it's the same Just for the native fish. There is a whole chain reaction that affects other life in and along the stream - native fish, spiders, birds, bats, etc.

The conclusion I draw is that if rainbows are introduced it is even more important to increase tree cover along the stream. Increasing tree cover may not really change the balance between species as the population of both will/ought to increase. OTOH - drifting flies, on the end of a line attached to a tenkara pole, in the middle of drifting insects in the stream is were we come in.


Furthermore , this was, I think, a study done in Japan. Species of native fishes here may respond differently to a non-native species that out-competes for drifting insects. Native species here may not so readily switch over to bottom feeding or other alternative source of food . Thus there may be a greater impact on the local native species from place to place. At least that's may take on their study.
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Re: The film RiverWebs and related ecology groups

Postby Owl Jones » Sun Jan 09, 2011 8:54 pm

Thus my question about ...you know what...I'm going to go watch them again. :) LOL
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Re: The film RiverWebs and related ecology groups

Postby Daniel @ Tenkara USA » Mon Jan 10, 2011 12:59 am

In other words, the rainbow trout out-compete the natives for the available food?

That was one of the findings they mentioned in the movie.
There is a whole chain reaction that affects other life in and along the stream - native fish, spiders, birds, bats, etc.

Indeed, that is exactly what they discuss in the movie. In fact, when they put the cover on the stream, they also studied the forest surrounding it and discovered that spiders moved out, birds and other animals were either less frequent or got smaller in size.

Furthermore , this was, I think, a study done in Japan. Species of native fishes here may respond differently to a non-native species that out-competes for drifting insects. Native species here may not so readily switch over to bottom feeding or other alternative source of food .

There were many studies being conducted. The original study was indeed done in Japan, but later Dr. Nakano started doing a lot of collaboration with researchers at UC Berkeley and other US schools. I believe their bigger collaboration was on the Smith River in Northern California.
And, while I'm sure there are many differences in the actual results of studies comparing two or more specific species (i.e. rainbow and brook v. rainbow and cutthroat v. rainbow and amago), the main point in the movie, and their studies, was the rather obvious conclusion that the forests surrounding the streams and the streams themselves are very deeply interconnected. It seems obvious enough, but I think their studies were very conclusive and showed great data on this, and were in a way groundbreaking because of that.
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